8

When I write $x_i^j$, the j is very high up, and it looks ugly. (This problem is especially apparent in the New Century Schoolbook font.)

$x_i^j$

I know that TeX is capable of automatically lowering it, since for example, $x_i^1$ looks fine. Is there a clean way to fix this?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fouriernc} % use the New Century Schoolbook font
\begin{document}
Contrast $x_i^j$ to $x_i^1$.  Why is the $j$ so high up?
\end{document}
  • What do you mean with "very high"? What I observe with the compiled code given is the default output of TeX. But if you want to raise or lower the j then that is something else. – azetina Apr 13 '12 at 19:18
  • 2
    If you use \smash{j} instead of j TeX will think it has zero height and (more importantly) zero depth and it will look more like the version with the 1. – Roelof Spijker Apr 13 '12 at 19:24
  • 2
    Have a look at the tensind package. It sets the high and low indices properly aligned. – Peter Breitfeld Apr 13 '12 at 19:30
1

Check below code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fouriernc} % use the New Century Schoolbook font
\begin{document}
Contrast $x_i^{\smash{j}}$ and $x_i^j$ to $x_i^i$.  Why is the $j$
so high up?
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.