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\[
\begin{cases} $ {x_1}^{(1)} =1,25 + 0,25 \cdot 0,68 - 0,375 \cdot 0,89 = 1,09$ \\${x_2}^{(1)} = -1,2 \cdot 1,1 + 0,3 \cdot 0,89 = - 0,71 $ \\  ${x_3}^{(1)} = 2+ 0,4 \cdot 1,1 -0,6 \cdot 0,68 =2,03$ 
\end{cases}
\]

Why do I get the error? I've also tried to write it in many different ways, for example using $$ ... $$, but it still didn't work. How should it be written?

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  • 1
    Welcome to TeX SX! The code should be \[ \begin{cases} {x_1}^{(1)} =1,25 + 0,25 \cdot 0,68 - 0,375 \cdot 0,89 = 1,09 {x_2}^{(1)} = -1,2 \cdot 1,1 + 0,3 \cdot 0,89 = - 0,71 \\ {x_3}^{(1)} = 2+ 0,4 \cdot 1,1 -0,6 \cdot 0,68 =2,03 \end{cases} \] , without any $ inside.
    – Bernard
    Dec 8, 2019 at 0:03
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    Also, never use $$ to start displayed maths in LaTeX, this might give inconsistent spacing.
    – Skillmon
    Dec 8, 2019 at 0:22
  • 2
    Expanding a little on Bernard's comment, the \[ command already starts (display) math mode, so you don't need (and you can't) use a $ inside it. Dec 8, 2019 at 0:23

1 Answer 1

0

You either use \[ or $ to mark the beginning and \] or $ to mark the end of an equation in LaTeX. You don't need to repeatedly write it down within the equation, only at the start and at the end. Also, if you would like to know the difference between \[ and $, the first one puts the equation in the middle of the next line, while the latter keeps it within the text line.

1
  • If possible, please post the corrected code also
    – MadyYuvi
    Jan 3 at 7:24

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