2

I tried to annotate my equation but the annotation shows up on the opposite side.

\begin{equation*}
a+k_nr=a(a^{\varphi(r)})^n \tag{dla n=1,2,\ldots,}
\end{equation*}

enter image description here

How do I move it to the right?

  • 1
    Did you use leqno option in your document? – ferahfeza Dec 28 '19 at 13:54
  • yeah i did, but when i delete this it makes my the numeration in other equations go to the wrong side – Martyna Michalska Dec 28 '19 at 14:06
  • \tag is for custom equation numbers the output goes on the same side as equation numbers. If you do not show a full document it is hard to guess what has been specified and "go to the wrong side" does not help anyone help you as we do not know which side you expect equation numbers, nor how you have specified them. Please always post a complete small document that shows the problem. – David Carlisle Dec 28 '19 at 14:11
  • 1
    also \tag is set in text mode, not that you have the wrong n and wrong space around = – David Carlisle Dec 28 '19 at 14:17
  • yeah, gonna fix it, thanks while posting I really thought the problem is just connected with that small part , that's why I decided not to attach a complete preamble – Martyna Michalska Dec 28 '19 at 14:27
4

Use the flalign and \llap so that it doesn't modify the placement of the main formula:

    \documentclass[11pt, leqno]{article}
    \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
    \usepackage{mathtools}

    \usepackage{showframe}
    \renewcommand{\ShowFrameLinethickness}{0.3pt}

    \begin{document}

    \begin{flalign}
     & & a+k_nr & =a(a^{\varphi(r)})^n & & \llap{(dla $ n=1,2,\ldots $)}
    \end{flalign}

    \end{document} 

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
3

Possibly not very satisfying for you, but flalign can be used:

\documentclass[oneside,leqno]{book}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\begin{document}
\begin{flalign*}
&&a+k_nr=a(a^{\varphi(r)})^n 
&&\text{(dla n=1,2,\ldots,)}
\end{flalign*}

\begin{equation}
c=a+b
\end{equation}
\end{document}

enter image description here

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    it actually does, thank you! – Martyna Michalska Dec 28 '19 at 14:22
  • 1
    @MartynaMichalska, Bernard's answer more useful, because aligning the equations done with it. – ferahfeza Dec 28 '19 at 14:28
  • 1
    The n=1,2,\ldots, particle should be in math mode. – Mico Dec 28 '19 at 16:00
  • @Mico, You are absolutely right. – ferahfeza Dec 28 '19 at 18:20

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