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Currently I am working on a textbook for students. I am looking for a way to place words before text, in order to show what concepts are defined in that alinea.

Something like this:

             Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do
             eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut 
             enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris 
Concept is   nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo **Concept**. Duis aute irure dolor 
shortly      in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu 
described    fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non 
here         proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est 
             laborum.  

I have tried to use the minipage and fullminipage environments, these keep placing one before the other. I have tried to find existing templates but to no avail. I'm starting to doubt if this is possible in Latex.

Is this possible in Latex? If so, how would I need to approach this problem?

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  • 1
    Welcome to TeX SX! Could you post an example (compilable) code of what you've tried?
    – Bernard
    Feb 10, 2020 at 14:16
  • 3
    Is it possible to make a large margin and use \marginpar (Or todonotes-package for fancier things)?
    – knut
    Feb 10, 2020 at 14:18
  • It's hard to tell what exactly you are looking for (an example code of what you've tried so far would help), but you might be looking for margin notes. They can for example be achieved with \marginpar, here are some examples: tex.stackexchange.com/q/411939/172164, tex.stackexchange.com/q/230753/172164, en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LaTeX/…
    – TivV
    Feb 10, 2020 at 18:04

1 Answer 1

2

How about using (long)table?

\documentclass[10pt,a4paper]{article}
\usepackage{longtable}
\usepackage{blindtext}
\begin{document}
\begin{longtable}{p{2cm}p{10cm}}
    Concept is described here & \blindtext
    
\end{longtable}



\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • This Achieves the effect I am looking for. Thank you.
    – SK4ndal
    Feb 17, 2020 at 13:49

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