3

Note that this is a different question from this one.

That aside, I was unable to find the markup for writing something like this: crossed derivative

As visible, I require the partial symbol to have a line across it.

I would also appreciate it if someone could mention the markup for a crossed normal derivative, too, as a bonus.

Thanks.

  • Welcome to TeX.SE! – Mico Feb 21 at 15:45
  • @Mico Thanks for the warm welcome! – William R. Ebenezer Feb 21 at 16:44
  • Does this answer your question? How to look up a symbol or identify a math symbol or character? – Teepeemm Feb 21 at 17:42
  • 1
    @Teepeemm - I've voted to re-open this posting as it is about more than looking up a symbol on the detexify site. A usable answer to the OP's query also requires pointing out the need to "wrap" the text-mode \dh macro in a \text or \textup directive. – Mico Feb 21 at 18:03
7

Something like this?

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc} % for "\dh" macro
\usepackage{amsmath}     % for "\textrm" macro
\newcommand{\crpartial}{\textup{\rmfamily\dh}}
\begin{document}
\[
dS \ge \frac{\crpartial q}{T}
\]
\end{document}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Uhm, maybe \textup? Otherwise the symbol will change e.g. in a theorem. Alternatively \textit from the very beginning, such that the symbol looks slanted no matter what. (On a personal note: as a theoretical physicist I hate this notation... :-)) – campa Feb 21 at 15:51
  • 1
    @William R. Ebenezer If you wonder where to find the right symbols, you may try (detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html) works quite well on your example. – Denis Feb 21 at 16:16
  • 3
    @AndréC \dh draws the symbol. \textupmakes sure it always appears identical inpendently from the context. – Denis Feb 21 at 16:18
  • 2
    @AndréC Indeed, \dh is in text mode. – Denis Feb 21 at 16:25
  • 1
    @Mico makes sense! Good day ;) – William R. Ebenezer Feb 21 at 17:57
4

If you're happy with U+00F0 LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH, that is, ð, then you can define it as a math symbol. I used italic, that seems more appropriate.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}

\DeclareSymbolFont{toneitalic}{T1}{\familydefault}{m}{it}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\cpartial}{\mathord}{toneitalic}{"F0}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation*}
dS\ge\frac{\cpartial q}{T}
\end{equation*}

\end{document}

enter image description here

The slot number "F0 is not a coincidence, as the T1 encoding tries to be as consistent with Latin-1 as possible. Anyway, in order to check, I did from the command line

latexdef dh

to get

\dh:
macro:->\T1-cmd \dh \T1\dh

Hmm, what should we ask for? With some background in the innards of LaTeX

latexdef 'T1\dh'

is the right thing to ask for:

\T1\dh:
\char"F0

You can also cross \partial. The following works with CM fonts, and can be adapted to other fonts. Not really good in \scriptscriptstyle; some work is needed in case.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,graphicx}

\makeatletter
\newcommand{\cross@partial}{\mathpalette\cross@@partial\relax}
\newcommand{\cross@@partial}[2]{%
  \makebox[0pt][r]{%
    \raisebox{-0.05\height}{%
      \makebox[0.5\width][l]{%
        \rotatebox[origin=l]{30}{$\m@th#1\mathchar'26$}%
      }%
    }%
  }%
}
\newcommand{\cpartial}{\partial\cross@partial}
\makeatother

\begin{document}

\begin{equation*}
dS\ge\frac{\cpartial q}{T}\quad\scriptstyle\cpartial
\end{equation*}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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