2

I often use the $\nearrow$ symbol when I have a strictly increasing sequence of numbers converging to some limit. However, I would like to have a symbol that looks like this: enter image description here

to signify that the sequence is weakly increasing. I've tried detexify and it couldn't find anything, so I was wondering if someone knew how to make (either find an existing or create a new one?) a symbol like this (and its decreasing counterpoint).

Thank you!

  • However your tag math-mode can be off-topic. – Sebastiano Feb 27 at 0:25
4

Maybe something like this?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{stmaryrd}
\usepackage{trimclip}
\newlength{\nnearrowheight}
\newlength{\ssearrowheight}
\settoheight{\nnearrowheight}{$\nnearrow$}
\settoheight{\ssearrowheight}{$\ssearrow$}
\newcommand{\bottomofnnearrow}{\makebox{\clipbox{0pt 0pt 0pt {.5\totalheight}}{$\nnearrow$}}}
\newcommand{\topofnnearrow}{\raisebox{.37\nnearrowheight}[.5\nnearrowheight][0pt]{\makebox{\clipbox{0pt {.5\totalheight} 0pt 0pt}{$\nnearrow$}}}}
\newcommand{\bottomofssearrow}{\makebox{\clipbox{0pt 0pt 0pt {.5\totalheight}}{$\ssearrow$}}}
\newcommand{\topofssearrow}{\raisebox{.37\ssearrowheight}[.5\ssearrowheight][0pt]{\makebox{\clipbox{0pt {.5\totalheight} 0pt 0pt}{$\ssearrow$}}}}
\newcommand{\upweakto}{\mathrel{%
    \bottomofnnearrow%
    \hspace*{-.7pt}\makebox[0pt]{$-$}\hspace*{.35pt}%
    \topofnnearrow\hspace*{-.65pt}%
}}
\newcommand{\downweakto}{\mathrel{%
    \hspace*{-.65pt}\topofssearrow%
    \hspace*{-.7pt}\makebox[0pt]{$-$}\hspace*{.35pt}%
    \bottomofssearrow%
}}
\begin{document}
\[ x_n \upweakto x \qquad y_n \downweakto y \]
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
4

Something as these symbols?

enter image description here

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article}
\usepackage{MnSymbol}
\begin{document}
$\sersquigarrow$ and $\nersquigarrow$
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    those look a bit too comical for my tastes lol. Maybe, if there are no better options. Anyways +1 – D.R Feb 26 at 23:54
  • 2
    Does the symbol represent a winding road signal? Lol. – manooooh Feb 27 at 0:13
  • 1
    @manooooh Men of little faith :-) – Sebastiano Feb 27 at 0:20
  • unfortunately the latter additions are no good because the arrows decrease, which kind of defeats the purpose of a symbol denoting weak monotonicity. – D.R Feb 27 at 0:21
  • @D.R I am agree; I delete the edit. – Sebastiano Feb 27 at 0:23

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