4

I have an equation:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{mathtools}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation*}
\chi^2_{k-1, \alpha}
\end{equation*}

\end{document}

This creates:

enter image description here

I would like the subscript (the k-1, \alpha) to be lower, to make it really look like a subscript.

I have seen this and the tug.org article by Timothy Hall. However, I cannot get the Hall version to compile. Could anyone give an MWE of how to move the subscript lower?

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    A cheap trick is to add a \vphantom of something tall, e.g. \chi^{2}_{\vphantom{1^{H}}k-1, \alpha}.
    – user194703
    Mar 18, 2020 at 23:52

1 Answer 1

6

Your example is somewhat deceiving in terms of the placement, since \chi is much deeper than you average symbol/letter, like X. For example, compare X^2_k to \chi^2_k:

enter image description here

You could introduce a taller subscript which should push it down further. Here is an option:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\[
  \chi^2_{k - 1, \alpha} \quad
  \chi^2_{{\textstyle\mathstrut}k - 1, \alpha}
\]

\end{document}

I've introduced a larger zero-width box of maximum height in \textstyle.

Note that dropping the subscript (through the introduction of something larger-than-usual) would impact the line height this construction sits on. It might not be visible within a math display, but be highlight if used in a regular paragraph setting.

1
  • 1
    Yes, that's why I chose it: I am literally working with \chi, so that's why I'm encountering the issue of the subscript not really looking like a subscript! Thanks very much for this solution. Mar 19, 2020 at 0:01

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