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What is the name of this symbol and how I can write it using Latex?

enter image description here

Thanks in advance.

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    Welcome to tex,sx. Where did you find it, and what is the context? – barbara beeton Mar 30 at 21:17
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    It is very much like the “phar” (or p’ari) letter in the Georgian script Asomtavruli (don't pronounce it “far”, but with an aspirated “p”). The picture, however, seems more like two P stuck together, after reflection of one of them. – egreg Mar 30 at 21:39
  • Thank you all for your reply. I found this symbol in a compuer science paper. The authors of the paper use it to denote a Performance Portability metric. – Ami Mar 31 at 22:52
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To me this looks exactly like a mirrored P merged with a normal P. I couldn't find it with Detexify, but it's not hard to construct.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\newlength{\fslength}
\makeatletter
\newcommand{\funnyP}{%
    \setlength{\fslength}{\f@size pt}%
    \reflectbox{P}\hspace*{-.359\fslength}\mbox{P}%
}
\makeatother
\begin{document}
\( \funnyP \) 
{\small \funnyP} 
{\funnyP} 
{\Large \funnyP} 
{\Huge \funnyP}
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
2

That symbol is qp ligature that is a combination of q and p (or c and p, or mirrored p and p). Perhaps here the symbol is in uppercase form. The Unicode of this symbol (in lowercase form) is U+0239 which can be used in tex engines other than pdflatex.

Here's another solution for using in normal latex which make use of \reflectbox to mirror P letter like this

enter image description here

A command like \qpligature can be defined as in the code below and used in either text or math mode:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,graphicx}
%
\newcommand{\qpligature}{\ensuremath{\reflectbox{\text{P}}\mkern-6mu\text{P}}}
%
\begin{document}
%

%
\section{Text mode}
In text mode with different size:

\qpligature  \quad \large \qpligature \quad \Large \qpligature \quad \huge \qpligature
%

\normalsize

\section{Math mode}

In inline equations $ \qpligature = q p $

In separate equations:

%
\begin{align*}
    \qpligature = q p
\end{align*}
%

\huge
%
\begin{align*}
\qpligature = q p
\end{align*}
%

\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The "qp ligature" is by (Unicode) definition a "small letter", whereas the letter shown in the question is distinctly uppercase. Two different things. – barbara beeton Mar 30 at 22:52
  • Then it's an upper case qp ligature. Same concept applies! – hesham Mar 30 at 22:59
  • I just thought to dig into the origin of that symbol and where it came from. – hesham Mar 30 at 23:00
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    Unfortunately, an uppercase "QP ligature" wouldn't look like this, because an uppercase "Q" is round with a tail. Historically in the Latin alphabet, lowercase forms weren't developed until much later than the uppercase forms, which were the forms inscribed on stone columns. So it's possible in some other script (Georgian has been suggested and rejected), but not Latin/italic. I'm still hoping that the OP will provide more information. – barbara beeton Mar 31 at 0:20
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    I won't attempt to name it without ore information about its context. If it has been used in a math paper, the author will have defined it, and that gives a possible hook. A symbol I encountered a few years ago is a mirrored "L"; it has since been used in multiple math works by different authors. The name by which these authors refer to it is "Le", referential to the shape but not the meaning. If this is math, it likely has a history, but I don't know it. I know it's not a phonetic/lingustic representation. – barbara beeton Mar 31 at 0:35

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