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Following this answer (https://tex.stackexchange.com/a/472967/211164), I'm trying to create a historic timeline ranging from 200,000 BCE to 2020 CE, but seemingly ran out of page space: "Dimension too large."

How can I extend the dimension to fit my timeline onto a sheet of paper? Alternatively, would it be easier to go vertical?

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{chronosys}

\newcommand{\mychronodatestyle}[1]{

\pgfmathparse{equal(sign(#1),-1)? int(abs(#1)):#1 }
\pgfmathresult
\pgfmathparse{equal(sign(#1),-1)? "BCE":}
 ~\pgfmathresult
 }

 \catcode`\!=11
 \def\eventyear{\!chreventyear}
 \catcode`\!=12

 \newcommand{\myeventdatestyle}[1]{
 \pgfmathparse{equal(sign(\eventyear),-1)? int(abs(\eventyear)):"#1"}
\pgfmathresult
 \pgfmathparse{equal(sign(\eventyear),-1)? "BCE":}
 ~\pgfmathresult
 }

\begin{document}
\startchronology
[startyear=-200000,stopyear=2020, arrow=false, height=0.2em, dateselevation=10pt,datesstyle=\mychronodatestyle]

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-100000}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-80000}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-7000}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-753}{Rome's foundation}

\chronoperiode[datesstyle=\mychronodatestyle,dateselevation=2pt]{-500}{-200}{important event}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-80}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/-2}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/6}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/68}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/895}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/1003}{something}

\chronoevent[datestyle=\myeventdatestyle ]
{12/2018}{something}

\stopchronology
\end{document}

Note: this is a condensed version as the actual version features many more date inputs.

6
  • 2
    Maybe you should use logarithmic scale?
    – Bernard
    Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 22:10
  • Thanks @Bernard, I'm intrigued. Any ideas how I could go about that?
    – TeXomat
    Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 22:26
  • It can be done with pstricks (precisely, its module pst-plot (see §9.23-9.27 of the documentation). I believe it also can be done with TikZ, but I don't it well enough to tell you with which package (pgfplots?).
    – Bernard
    Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 22:44
  • I have tried since your last comment to come up with something useful, but utterly failed in doing so. I have never used pstricks/pst-plot before. Do you have a MWE or do you know where I could find one? Thank you!
    – TeXomat
    Commented May 12, 2020 at 13:17
  • For an example with log-scales see here: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/606048/…
    – MS-SPO
    Commented Jul 22, 2021 at 20:39

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