4

The following code producdes the first attached picture:

settings.outformat="pdf";
unitsize(1cm);

import graph;

path Ellipse(pair centre = (0,0), real xradius, real yradius){
    return shift( ( centre ) )*scale( xradius, yradius )*Circle( (0,0), 1);
}

real step = 1.4, height = 1.3;

guide U = Circle( (0,0), 1), E = Ellipse( (0,0), 1.3, 0.6 ), B = box( (-1.2, -0.5), (1.2,0.5) ), Bo = box( (-0.4, -1.2), (0.4,1.2) ), all[] = U ^^ E ^^ B ^^ Bo;

draw( (-step,0) -- (2.2*1.5step,0), invisible );
draw( (0,-height) -- (0,height), invisible );

draw(all);

guide g = all[0];

for(int k = 1; k < all.length; ++k){
    g = buildcycle(g, all[k]);
}

draw(shift(2.2step)*g);

What I actually want to draw is precisely the border of the 4 paths, as in the second attached picture (done with Inkscape); I followed the instructions given in this answer; there, the figures are not concentric and perphaps that is why the final path obtained is the one given there.

How can I obtain the border of the four figures as in the second picture? Thanks!

Asymptote result Desired image

8
  • I am assuming that you won't be excited about "fill all the paths white" answers, right? ;-)
    – user194703
    Commented May 5, 2020 at 0:26
  • @Schrödinger'scat: it would be certainly a solution, but one which furnishes me no new knowledge ;) Commented May 5, 2020 at 0:30
  • Both proposed answers are simple and useful! I'd really like seeing a solution involving the buildcyle function, though. Commented May 5, 2020 at 4:21
  • It seems that buildcycle is not working when there are 3 ou more intersections points.
    – O.G.
    Commented May 5, 2020 at 20:14
  • 1
    Having E (and all) as variable names should be avoided since E is defined as east (-1,0).
    – O.G.
    Commented May 5, 2020 at 20:44

3 Answers 3

4

My solution is a more automated version of the answer from @chishimotoji. My code breaks all the paths up into subpaths and then automatically determines which should be plotted using inside(path p, pair z) functions.

I created the isOutside and getOuterSubpaths functions as defined below. Using these functions, you will only need to define the paths, sends them to the functions, and draw the subpaths that are returned.

One advantage of this automation is that the code does not expand exponentially as more paths are added, as shown in the figure at the right.

I've only tested this code with the paths as shown below.

Sample Code Output

settings.outformat="pdf";
unitsize(1inch);

bool isOutside(pair p, path[] paths)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < paths.length; ++i)
    {
        if (inside(paths[i], p)) { return false; }
    }
    return true;
}

path[] getOuterSubpaths(path[] ps)
{
    path[] subpaths;
    for (int i = 0; i < ps.length; ++i)
    {
        path[] otherPaths;
        real[] times = { 0.0};
        for (int j = 0; j < ps.length; ++j)
        {
            if (j == i) { continue; }
            otherPaths.push(ps[j]);
            real[][] newTimes = intersections(ps[i], ps[j]);
            for (int k = 0; k < newTimes.length; ++k)
            {
                times.push(newTimes[k][0]);
            }
        }
        times.push(size(ps[i]));
        times = sort(times);
        for (int j = 1; j < times.length; ++j)
        {
            real thisTime = times[j];
            real lastTime = times[j-1];
            real midTime = (thisTime + lastTime) / 2.0;
            pair midLocation = point(ps[i], midTime);
            if (isOutside(midLocation, otherPaths))
            {
                subpaths.push(subpath(ps[i], lastTime, thisTime));
            }
        }
    }
    return subpaths;
}

path[] startPaths;
startPaths.push(unitcircle);
startPaths.push(scale(1.3,0.6)*unitcircle);
startPaths.push(scale(2.4,1.0)*shift(-0.5,-0.5)*unitsquare);
startPaths.push(scale(0.8,2.4)*shift(-0.5,-0.5)*unitsquare);
draw(startPaths);

path[] outerSubpaths = getOuterSubpaths(startPaths);
draw(outerSubpaths, 4+red);

startPaths.push(rotate(45)*scale(1.4,0.2)*unitcircle);
startPaths.push(rotate(135)*scale(1.4,0.2)*unitcircle);
draw(shift(3.0,0)*startPaths);
path[] outerSubpaths = getOuterSubpaths(startPaths);
draw(shift(3.0,0)*outerSubpaths, 4+red);
3
  • Fascinating! I've a question about your boolean function: why do you have return true after the loop? Wouldn't that always return true? Commented May 5, 2020 at 21:07
  • @ÓscarGuajardo: Thank you. the loop in the boolean function is checking to see if the point p is inside any of your original paths. If it is, then the function returns false and the return true; line is never reached.
    – James
    Commented May 5, 2020 at 23:17
  • Great ! very interesting code
    – O.G.
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 7:03
5

This is raw code! Clean code should be written by yourself.

unitsize(1cm);
guide U = circle( (0,0), 1), 
      E = ellipse( (0,0), 1.3, 0.6 ), 
      B = box( (-1.2, -0.5), (1.2,0.5) ), 
      Bo = box( (-0.4, -1.2), (0.4,1.2) ), 
      all[] = U ^^ E ^^ B ^^ Bo;
pair[] Int=intersectionpoints(U,Bo);
pair[] Intt=intersectionpoints(U,B);
pair[] IntT=intersectionpoints(E,B);
real[][] Intr=intersections(U,Bo);
real[][] Inttr=intersections(U,B);
real[][] IntTr=intersections(E,B);

draw(Int[0]--max(Bo)--(xpart(min(Bo)),max(Bo).y)--Int[1],dashed+red);
draw(subpath(U,Intr[1][0],Inttr[1][0]),dashed+purple);
draw(Intt[1]--(min(B).x,max(B).y)--IntT[3],blue+dashed);
draw(subpath(E,IntTr[3][0],IntTr[4][0]),gray+dashed);
draw(IntT[4]--min(B)--Intt[2],cyan+dashed);
draw(subpath(U,Inttr[2][0],Intr[2][0]),magenta+dashed);
draw(Int[2]--min(Bo)--(max(Bo).x,min(Bo).y)--Int[3],dashed);
draw(subpath(U,Intr[3][0],Inttr[3][0]),magenta+dashed);
draw(Intt[3]--(max(B).x,min(B).y)--IntT[7],dashed);

path knight=(max(B).x,min(B).y)--max(B);
path m1=cut(E,knight,0).before,m2=cut(E,knight,1).after;
draw(m2^^m1,green);

draw(IntT[0]--max(B)--Intt[0],dashed);
draw(subpath(U,Inttr[0][0],Intr[0][0]),dashed+orange);
shipout(bbox(2mm,invisible));

enter image description here

2
  • Beautiful approach! Thanks! What did you mean by "raw code" and "clean code"? Commented May 5, 2020 at 4:24
  • Have a look at here
    – user213378
    Commented May 5, 2020 at 4:56
3

One can plot this very easily if one knows the polar coordinate representations of the rectangle and ellipse. Here is the asymptote code:

\documentclass[varwidth,border=3mm]{standalone}
\usepackage{asymptote}
\begin{document}
\begin{asy}
settings.outformat="pdf";
import graph;
size(8cm,0);

real rrect(real a,real b,real t) { 
    return 1/max(abs(cos(t)/a),abs(sin(t)/b)); };

real relli(real a,real b,real t) { 
    return  a*b/sqrt((b*cos(t))**2+(a*sin(t))**2);};

real rrr(real t) {real [] tmp={relli(1.3,0.6,t),rrect(1.2,0.5,t),rrect(0.5,1.2,t),1};
return max(tmp);};

pair f(real t) { return (rrr(t)*cos(t),rrr(t)*sin(t)); }

draw(graph(f, 0, 2*pi, n=721), thick());

\end{asy}
\end{document}

enter image description here

For the explanations, let me switch to TikZ with which I am more familiar.

A rectangle width \a and height \b has the polar representation (called rrect in the asymptote code)

Rplane(\a,\b,\t)=1/max(abs(cos(\t)/\a),abs(sin(\t)/\b));

where \t is the angle, as illustrated in

\documentclass[tikz,border=3mm]{standalone}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[declare function={%
    Rplane(\a,\b,\t)=1/max(abs(cos(\t)/\a),abs(sin(\t)/\b));}]
 \begin{scope}
  \draw plot[variable=\t,domain=0:360,samples=361]
  (\t:{Rplane(1.2,0.5,\t)});    
  \draw[red,dashed] (-1.2,-0.5) rectangle (1.2,0.5);
 \end{scope}
 \begin{scope}[xshift=3cm]
  \draw plot[variable=\t,domain=0:360,samples=361]
  (\t:{Rplane(0.5,1.2,\t)});    
  \draw[red,dashed] (-0.5,-1.2) rectangle (0.5,1.2);
 \end{scope}
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

enter image description here

An ellipse has the representation (called relli in the asymptote code)

Rellipse(\a,\b,\t)=\a*\b/sqrt(pow(\b*cos(\t),2)+pow(\a*sin(\t),2));

as illustrated in

\documentclass[tikz,border=3mm]{standalone}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[declare function={%
    Rellipse(\a,\b,\t)=\a*\b/sqrt(pow(\b*cos(\t),2)+pow(\a*sin(\t),2));}]
 \draw plot[variable=\t,domain=0:360,samples=361]
 (\t:{Rellipse(1.3,0.6,\t)});   
 \draw[cyan,dashed] (0,0) circle[x radius=1.3,y radius=0.6];
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

enter image description here

So all one needs to do is to plot the maximum of the radius function of the rectangles, ellipse and circle, for which it is just a constant radius.

\documentclass[tikz,border=3mm]{standalone}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[declare function={%
    Rplane(\a,\b,\t)=1/max(abs(cos(\t)/\a),abs(sin(\t)/\b));
    Rellipse(\a,\b,\t)=\a*\b/sqrt(pow(\b*cos(\t),2)+pow(\a*sin(\t),2));}]
 \draw[very thick] plot[variable=\t,domain=0:360,samples=361]
 (\t:{max(Rplane(1.2,0.5,\t),Rplane(0.5,1.2,\t),Rellipse(1.3,0.6,\t),1)});  
 \draw[red,densely dashed] (-1.2,-0.5) rectangle (1.2,0.5);
 \draw[orange,densely dashed] (-0.5,-1.2) rectangle (0.5,1.2);
 \draw[blue,densely dashed] (0,0) circle[radius=1];
 \draw[cyan,densely dashed] (0,0) circle[x radius=1.3,y radius=0.6]; 
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • The TikZ solution is very neat! Thanks! Commented May 5, 2020 at 4:27

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