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I would like to enumerate where \item would start with a), b), c)...and so on AUTOMATICALLY. This is very important for me. I tried something like this:

\begin{enumerate}[label=\alph*)]
    \item something 1
    * something *
    \item something 2
    * something *
\end{enumerate}

But I think there is something wrong

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    The code works for me if I load \usepackage{enumitem}. Did you load enumitem in your document? Can you explain in more detail how things are (going) wrong? (Just saying 'it doesn't work' doesn't leave a lot of routes for investigation. The gold standard for questions is including an MWE: tex.meta.stackexchange.com/q/228/35864. A short, yet complete example document that shows what you are doing. In this case the MWE would have shown if you load enumitem or not.) – moewe May 27 '20 at 14:24
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    Does this answer your question? Changing the default numbering scheme in enumerate environment – oliversm May 27 '20 at 14:24
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    Welcome to TeX.SX! You say that you "think there is something wrong", could you precise that? What is not working? To show what is happening, could you make your example compilable? It should start with \documentclass{...} and end with \end{document}, and should reproduce the problem. – Vincent May 27 '20 at 14:24
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If you load \usepackage{enumerate}, you may directly enter the format of numerals of your liking (e.g. a), (a), 1), (1) ,A), (A), ... and so on)

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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumerate}
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}[a)]
    \item something 1
    * something *
    \item something 2
    * something *
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}
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You can avoiding loading extra packages by using \def\labelenumi{(\alph{enumi})}. (You can place this inside the enumerate if you only want it to apply to particular list).

\documentclass{article}
\def\labelenumi{(\alph{enumi})}
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}
\item First item
\item Second item
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}

Further, in general, I would say (a) is preferable to a) because when you refer to the latter in your text later, it can be confused for a normal closed parenthesis.

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