0

Code:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{float}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document} 
    \begin{equation}
        \begin{aligned}
            &\vec{I}_g + \vec{I}_{R_1} = 0 &\Rightarrow \vec{V}_1 &= \vec{V}_g\\
            &-\vec{I}_{R_1} + \vec{I}_C = 0 & &\\
            &-\vec{I}_C + \vec{I}_{R_2} = 0 & &\\
            &-\vec{I}_{R_1} + I_x + \vec{I}_{R_L} = 0 &\Rightarrow \vec{V}_3 &= 0
        \end{aligned}
        \qquad
        \begin{aligned}
            & \vec{I}_{R_1} = \left(\vec{V}_1 - \vec{V}_2\right)/R_1\\
            & \vec{I}_{R_2} = \left(\vec{V}_3 - \vec{V}_4\right)/R_2\\
            & \vec{I}_{R_L} = \vec{V}_4/R_L\\
            & \vec{I}_C = j\omega C \left(\vec{V}_2 - \vec{V}_3\right)\\
            & \vec{I}_G = ?\\
            & \vec{I}_x = ?
        \end{aligned}
    \end{equation}
\end{document}

Output:

enter image description here

Desired output:

enter image description here

My professor actually made this diagram in Scientific Word. I am trying to get the spacings in my output the same as what he did. I am also curious on why the question marks that I wrote are closer than the other equations on the RHS for the current (I, amp) equations (whereas for his, his question marks are as spaced from the equal sign as the others). Is there a way to properly space the content like what he did (and get the enumeration numbers to the left of the 4 equations on the left)?

2
  • What is it, that you want to achieve exactly? Are you talking about the horizontal spacing between the elements? So you want the center column closer to the left and a wider distance to the right column? – TobiBS Jun 6 '20 at 23:47
  • So let’s see: I just want the center 2 equations spaced out more from the set of equations on the right, the \Rightarrows spaced out more in between the left and the center column of equations, and the left 4 equations having enumerations. – Superman Jun 6 '20 at 23:48
1

Does this suit to your needs?

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{float}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document} 
    \begin{equation}
        \begin{aligned}
            &\mbox{1)}&&\vec{I}_g + \vec{I}_{R_1} = 0 &\Rightarrow \qquad \vec{V}_1 &= \vec{V}_g\\
            &\mbox{2)}&&-\vec{I}_{R_1} + \vec{I}_C = 0 & &\\
            &\mbox{3)}&&-\vec{I}_C + \vec{I}_{R_2} = 0 & &\\
            &\mbox{4)}&&-\vec{I}_{R_1} + I_x + \vec{I}_{R_L} = 0 &\Rightarrow \qquad \vec{V}_3 &= 0
        \end{aligned}
        \qquad\qquad
        \begin{aligned}
            & \vec{I}_{R_1} = \left(\vec{V}_1 - \vec{V}_2\right)/R_1\\
            & \vec{I}_{R_2} = \left(\vec{V}_3 - \vec{V}_4\right)/R_2\\
            & \vec{I}_{R_L} = \vec{V}_4/R_L\\
            & \vec{I}_C = j\omega C \left(\vec{V}_2 - \vec{V}_3\right)\\
            & \vec{I}_G = \mbox{?}\\
            & \vec{I}_x = \mbox{?}
        \end{aligned}
    \end{equation}
\end{document}

It results in: Result

7
  • That looks close enough! How about the question marks? – Superman Jun 7 '20 at 0:07
  • Also, could alignat also be the solution? I am not sure how the && works in alignat. – Superman Jun 7 '20 at 0:07
  • @Superman: This is why I asked, what exactly you are looking for, because there is more to see. ;-) Put them in \mbox{?}, too and see my updated answer. And of course alignat would be an alternative, as well as flalign. It depends a bit on the overall environment, where you are typesetting this and what you want to achieve. For my personal flavor I'd also align the equal signs in the third row, instead of the vectors, the same for the first column. I think it's more important to see, that they all equal 0, isn't it? So instead of copying visual output, think about the message you transport. – TobiBS Jun 7 '20 at 0:22
  • 1
    @Superman, this is a question on it's own, but it has been answered before: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/146909/what-does-mbox-do – TobiBS Jun 7 '20 at 0:29
  • 1
    @Superman and a more correct way would probably be: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/172486/… – TobiBS Jun 7 '20 at 0:32

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.