3

I am trying to write a unit for decibel (dB) inside a math environment using siunitx package and I cannot figure out how to make it bold.

I understand that instead of using siunitx package and math mode I can just write dB, but I want to figure out how to do it this way.

I have tried \boldmath and \boldsymbol{} but none of them are working.


Here is my code.

\begin{table}[h!]
\centering
\begin{tabular}{SS}
    \toprule
    \multicolumn{2}{c}{\textbf{Permissible Noise Exposures}}\\
    \toprule
    %\rowcolor{clc!50}
    \textbf{Duration per Day (in hours)} & \textbf{Sound Level (in \boldmath $\si{dB}$ \footnotemark)} \\
    \midrule
    8 & 90 \\
    6 & 92 \\
    4 & 95 \\
    3 & 97 \\
    2 & 100 \\
    1 & 105 \\
    0.5 & 110 \\
    $\mathtt{\leq}$0.25 & 115 \\
    \bottomrule
\end{tabular} 
\caption{Permissible Noise Exposures}
\subcaption*{Source: 29 CFR 1910.95, Table G-16}
\label{tab:noise-exposure} 
\end{table}\bigskip
\footnotetext{When measured on the A scale of a standard sound level meter at slow response.}

And this is the output. Notice that the dB symbol is not bolded. enter image description here

3

I suggest you add the option detect-weight to the \si, \SI, and \num instructions. The option informs siunitx that it should utilize information about the font weight of the surrounding material; if that font weight happens to be bold, it'll be applied to the arguments of \si, \SI, and \num.

For more information about utilizing font-related information from the commands' surrounding material, see section 5.2, "Detecting fonts", of the package's user guide.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{siunitx}    
\begin{document}
\textbf{Sound Level (in \si{dB})}

\textbf{Sound Level (in \si[detect-weight]{dB})}
\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thank you so much! This completely answeres my question! – Vladimir Jun 10 at 1:11

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