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how to do $\mathbb{P}, \mathcal{F}$ in this program?

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  • 1
    Welcome to TeX.SE. Which version of SWP do you use?
    – Mico
    Jul 1, 2020 at 18:31
  • 5.5, I know that when I want to write sth in tex I have to press ctrl and write code (for example ctrl+alpha) but I dont know how to do these two symbols. Is there an option to write sth in tex and then convert this to symbol?
    – Mr.Price
    Jul 1, 2020 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

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Now I have seen into this link the Document 288: How to get the symbol for real numbers where the are Version are: 3.x, 4.x, 5.x - Scientific WorkPlace, Scientific Word & Scientific Notebook.

I add also the document RealNumberSymbolsSN30.tex into the reference:

%% This document created by Scientific Notebook (R) Version 3.0
    \documentclass[12pt,thmsa]{article}
    %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
    \usepackage{sw20jart}
    
    %TCIDATA{TCIstyle=article/art4.lat,jart,sw20jart}
    
    %TCIDATA{<META NAME="ViewSettings" CONTENT="31">}
    %TCIDATA{<META NAME="GraphicsSave" CONTENT="32">}
    %TCIDATA{Created=Mon Aug 19 14:52:24 1996}
    %TCIDATA{LastRevised=Fri May 26 14:50:19 2000}
    %TCIDATA{Language=American English}
    %TCIDATA{CSTFile=Lab Report.cst}
    %TCIDATA{PageSetup=72,72,72,72,0}
    %TCIDATA{AllPages=
    %F=36,\PARA{038<p type="texpara" tag="Body Text" >\hfill \thepage}
    %}
    
    
    \input{tcilatex}
    \begin{document}
    
    
    \section{Scientific Notebook and Real Number Symbols}
    
    The symbols $\UNICODE{0x2102} \UNICODE{0x210d} \UNICODE{0x2115} 
    \UNICODE{0x2119} \UNICODE{0x211a} \UNICODE{0x211d} \UNICODE{0x2124} $ are
    often used to represent Real Numbers. Traditionally the symbols for the Real
    Numbers were typeset in bold. Because mathematicians usually do not have
    access to bold chalk, they invented the special symbols that are now often
    used to represent the number sets. These symbols are known as Blackboard
    Bold. Before insisting on using them, consider whether going back to the old
    system of ordinary bold might not be acceptable.
    
    \textsl{Scientific Word/Scientific WorkPlace}{} provides a complete set of
    the upper case Blackboard Bold symbols. However, the LaTeX font containing
    the Blackboard Bold symbols is not included with \textsl{Scientific
    Notebook\/}. Only $\UNICODE{0x2102} \UNICODE{0x210d} \UNICODE{0x2115} 
    \UNICODE{0x2119} \UNICODE{0x211a} \UNICODE{0x211d} \UNICODE{0x2124} $ are
    available using the fonts added to your computer when \textsl{Scientific
    Notebook\/}{} was installed, but there isn't a way to directly enter these
    symbols using \textsl{Scientific Notebook\/}{}.
    
    You can enter any of the symbols $\UNICODE{0x2102} \UNICODE{0x210d} 
    \UNICODE{0x2115} \UNICODE{0x2119} \UNICODE{0x211a} \UNICODE{0x211d} 
    \UNICODE{0x2124} $ by highlighting them in this document, copying to the
    clipboard, moving to your document and pasting the symbols.
    
    If you will use any of the symbols fairly often, then you may want to create
    a fragment that contains the symbols. To create such a fragment, highlight
    the symbols $\UNICODE{0x2102} \UNICODE{0x210d} \UNICODE{0x2115} 
    \UNICODE{0x2119} \UNICODE{0x211a} \UNICODE{0x211d} \UNICODE{0x2124} $ and
    then select \textsf{File, Save Fragment }and enter a convenient name such as 
    \texttt{Blackboard Bold}. Once the fragment is saved, you can use the
    Fragments pop-up to select ''Blackboard Bold'' and the seven available
    characters will be inserted into your document. You may also want to create
    separate fragments for each character, perhaps using the names \texttt{BbbC,
    BbbH,} etc. for each Blackboard Bold symbol.
    
    \end{document}
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  • 1
    thank you! I also found answer to my second question (solution is to choose caligraphic) :)
    – Mr.Price
    Jul 1, 2020 at 20:27
  • @Piszczu I'm glady to help you. All the best.
    – Sebastiano
    Jul 1, 2020 at 20:56

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