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I want to draw a multiple 'commutative' diagram that looks as follows:

enter image description here

My working trial is as follows:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{matrix}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}
  \matrix (m) [matrix of math nodes, row sep=3em,
    column sep=3em]{
            & MC_1  &       & TM_1\\
    MC_2    &       & TM_2  & \\
            & BM_1  &       & TM_2 \\
    BM_2    &       & FM_2  & \\};
  \path[-stealth]
    (m-1-2) edge (m-1-4) edge (m-2-1) edge (m-3-2)
    (m-1-4) edge (m-3-4) edge (m-2-3)
    (m-2-1) edge [-,line width=6pt,draw=white] (m-2-3)
            edge (m-2-3) edge (m-4-1)
    (m-3-2) edge  (m-3-4)
            edge  (m-4-1)
    (m-4-1) edge (m-4-3)
    (m-3-4) edge (m-4-3)
    (m-2-3) edge [-,line width=6pt,draw=white] (m-4-3)
            edge (m-4-3);
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

that produces:

enter image description here

I need the arrow to be in blue color and the line in black. How to achieve this? Please help.

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1 Answer 1

3

This is with tikz-cd:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath,tikz-cd}

\begin{document}

\[
\begin{tikzcd}[row sep=6ex,column sep=2em]
&&& \mathrm{MC}_1 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[d,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
      \mathrm{TM}_1 \arrow[ddl,dash] \\
&&& \mathrm{BM}_1 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
      \mathrm{FM}_1 \arrow[u,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash]
\\[-4ex]
&& \mathrm{MC}_2 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[d,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
     \mathrm{TM}_2 \arrow[ddl,dash] \\
&& \mathrm{BM}_2 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
     \mathrm{FM}_2 \arrow[u,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash]
\\[-4ex]
& \mathrm{MC}_3 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[d,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
      \mathrm{TM}_3 \arrow[ddl,dash] \\
& \mathrm{BM}_3 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash] &&
      \mathrm{FM}_3 \arrow[u,blue] \arrow[ddl,dash]
\\[-4ex]
\mathrm{MC}_4 \arrow[rr,blue] \arrow[d,blue] &&
      \mathrm{TM}_4 \\
\mathrm{BM}_4 \arrow[rr,blue] &&
      \mathrm{FM}_4 \arrow[u,blue]
\end{tikzcd}
\]

\end{document}

enter image description here

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