8

What font is seen in the picture? (the book is Fundamentals of Complex Analysis by Saff and Snider.): enter image description here

6
  • 1
    Have you tried any of the things mentioned in tex.stackexchange.com/questions/45919? Aug 1 '20 at 19:59
  • Yes but most of what I install to find fonts in documents never works due to the device I use.
    – user212817
    Aug 1 '20 at 20:01
  • I think this kind of fonts is used by "Cambridge university press" but I'm not sure, please affirm that if it's correct!
    – Med-Elf
    Aug 1 '20 at 20:05
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    Typical Times font. The recommended one in LaTeX nowadays is newtx: ctan.org/pkg/newtx.
    – ivankokan
    Aug 1 '20 at 20:21
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    @ivankokan - The newtxmath math font package is definitely an improvement over the older txfonts and mathptmx packages. I don't think, though, that the newtxmath package can be said to be "better" than the mtpro2 package -- other than the fact that newtxmath is free of charge whereas the mtpro2 package is commercial and non-free (though not particularly expensive either).
    – Mico
    Aug 2 '20 at 15:46
17

For my humble opinion it is

\usepackage{newtxtext}
\usepackage[lite]{mtpro2}

Here a screenshot taken from the documentation of newtx pag. 17:

enter image description here

And here's a reproduction of the first long equation in the screenshot you posted:

enter image description here

This is the link to install the font mtpro2 v. lite (hence it is not complete).

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{newtxtext} % Times Roman clone text font (not crucial)
\usepackage[zswash,lite]{mtpro2} % math font package
\begin{document}
\[
\int_{-\infty}^{\infty} \frac{e^{-3ix}}{2(x^2+4)}dx+0
   =-2\pi i \lim_{z\to-2i}(z+2i)f_2(z)
\]
\end{document}
17
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    @user143 Yes of course...you must download before the package of the fonts and install them.
    – Sebastiano
    Aug 1 '20 at 21:32
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    You chose a very good excerpt from the OP's screenshot -- one that includes both \int and \infty -- to demonstrate that the math font is not just any old Times Roman (TR) clone but, specifically, mtpro2. Virtually all other TR math fonts I'm familiar with draw the infinity symbol with a constant stroke width; mtpro is almost unique in varying the stroke width of this symbol.
    – Mico
    Aug 2 '20 at 15:27
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    @Mico Sometimes the wheel of fortune turns for me too...but I'd like another wheel of serenity to turn :-( I remembered something in the documentation since I often use it for my book...😏
    – Sebastiano
    Aug 2 '20 at 15:30
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    +1 You have to look carefully to find what is the character font. How did you do ?
    – AndréC
    Aug 2 '20 at 15:55
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    @AndréC 😷😷😷 with the mask...to keep my smile out of view. If you look at my profile there are a lot of questions about mtpro2 which is a package I really like. For me it's the favorite. I immediately recognized the fonts by the integral symbol.
    – Sebastiano
    Aug 2 '20 at 15:58
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Here's your font according to @ivankokan \usepackage{newtxtext}and \usepackege{newtxmath}

\documentclass{article} 
    \usepackage{newtxtext}
    \usepackage{newtxmath}  
   \begin{document}
However, the combination \[\int_{-\rho}^{\rho} f_2(x)dx+\int_{C_\rho^-}f_2(z)dz\] equals \textit{minus} $2\pi \mathrm{Res}(f_2 ;-2i)$, because$\cdots$ 
   \end{document}

And here's your text! good luck! enter image description here

1
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    +1. A clue that newtxmath was not used in the production of the Saff & Snider textbook is that the + symbol produced by newtxmath uses fairly short and thick strokes and that the symbol's vertical stroke does not protrude below the baseline. In contrast, the + symbol shown in the OP's screenshot employs a thinner as well as longer strokes, with the vertical stroke clearly protruding below the baseline. Of course, these observations do not imply that newtxmath isn't a fine package. Quite to the contrary! It just means that newtxmath wasn't used in the textbook.
    – Mico
    Aug 2 '20 at 16:00

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