3

I want to write like this: enter image description here

But when I write

\documentclass{article} \usepackage{mathtools} \begin{document} \begin{equation} \lim\limits_{\Delta\rightarrow0}\Delta{}_{t=0}^{t=T}\left\vert\dfrac{df(t)}{dt}\right\vert^2 dt \end{equation} \end{document}

The output was like this enter image description here

Anyone can tell me what is my mistake?

3
  • 2
    As always on this site please post a full minimal example, not just a sniplet like this. Please post something others can copy and test as is without adding anything
    – daleif
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 15:18
  • Use this \lim\limits_{\Delta\to 0}\; \Delta_{t=0}^{t=T}\;\left| \dfrac{d\,f(t)}{dt} \right|^2\; dt
    – Tanvir
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 15:18
  • @daleif thank you, I've edited it.
    – Wind
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 16:05

3 Answers 3

1

The _{t=0}^{t=T} in your line makes these things the superscript and subscript of the \lim\limits_{\Delta\rightarrow0}{}. I would do it using \prescript from mathtools package.

\usepackage{mathtools}

and then in the math environment:

\lim\limits_{\Delta\rightarrow0}{} \Delta\prescript{t=T}{t=0}{\left\vert\dfrac{df(t)}{dt}\right\vert^2 dt}

This provides the result as follows:enter image description here

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  • The upper prescript is higher than necessary. Unfortunately, I don't know how to modify it using this method. Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 18:14
  • 1
    @barbarabeeton I have used \lower command. See my update 1.
    – Sebastiano
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 22:24
3

Here's an attempt to faithfully reproduce the first screenshot you posted.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{array}
\usepackage{newtxtext,newtxmath} % optional
\begin{document}
\[
\lim_{\Delta\phantom{\to}0} \Delta
\begin{array}{>{\scriptstyle}l@{}} t=T \\ t=0 \end{array}
\Bigl| \frac{df\!(t)}{dt} \Bigr|^2 dt
\]
\end{document}
4
  • I feel the original image posted is missing tends to in the limits. It's a strange equation as it means nothing.
    – Tanvir
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 15:29
  • 2
    @Tanvir - The OP stated that he/she wanted to reproduce the first image. The code in my answer achieves that.
    – Mico
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 15:31
  • @Tanvir yes, you're right. there is something missing and a strange equation, because the source file that I used has incomplete equation.
    – Wind
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 16:10
  • 1
    @Mico thank you for your answer.
    – Wind
    Commented Aug 4, 2020 at 16:10
3

Using...tensor package.....with the enviroment mathtools...an alternative a bit more complicated :-)

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{tensor}

\begin{document}
\[\lim_{\Delta\phantom{\to}0} \Delta \tensor*[^T_t]{\bigg\lvert \frac{df(t)}{dt}\bigg\rvert}{^2} dt\]
\end{document}  

enter image description here

Update 1

Using \lower-0.01em with \hbox and \scriptstyle it is possible a nice alignment between T and 2.

\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{tensor}

\begin{document}
\[\lim_{\Delta\to 0} \Delta \tensor*[^{\lower-0.01em \hbox{$\scriptstyle T$}}_t]{\bigg\lvert \frac{df(t)}{dt}\bigg\rvert}{^2} dt\]
\end{document} 

enter image description here

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