1

I want to write something like this SomeCode^MoreCode, so I wrote the code below.

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[english,greek]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{kerkis}


\begin{document}

\textlatin{\texttt{SomeCode\^{}MoreCode}}

\textlatin{Some text \^{} more text}

\end{document}

The problem is that I don't get the symbol ^ when it is in texttt{}. If I delete kerkis-font, everything is OK.

enter image description here

What can I do?

Thanks in advance!

  • 1
    Add \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} to the preamble and check. – Tanvir Sep 14 at 10:20
  • @Tanvir ,thanks a lot! Problem solved! How can I mark your comment as an answer? – Kώστας Κούδας Sep 14 at 10:33
  • 1
    I felt this being a simple thing, so I just add the answer as a comment. You may add an update to your question, mentioning the answer. – Tanvir Sep 14 at 10:36
  • 1
    do you really want \^{} a hat accent over nothing, why not use ^ which is \textasciicircum – David Carlisle Sep 14 at 11:25
  • @Tanvir , I 've been to late for that... I marked as an answer David's answer. Thank's for your answer! – Kώστας Κούδας Sep 15 at 6:19
3

You need T1 encoding to get a larger range of characters, but also I think you want the character ^ which you can get with \textasciiicircum or \verb not a circumflex accent over nothing:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[english,greek]{babel}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{kerkis}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}

\begin{document}

\textlatin{\texttt{SomeCode\^{}MoreCode}}

\textlatin{Some text \^{} more text}


\textlatin{\texttt{SomeCode\textasciicircum{}MoreCode}}

\textlatin{Some text \textasciicircum{} more text}

\begin{otherlanguage}{english} \verb|SomeCode^MoreCode| \end{otherlanguage}

\end{document}
| improve this answer | |
  • thanks a lot! You gave me many advises! I had problem with verb, but now I know what to do! – Kώστας Κούδας Sep 15 at 6:08
2

For unknown reasons, the developers of the Kerkis fonts released them with a nonstandard version of the OT1 encoding.

Indeed, in kerkis.sty we find

\DeclareTextAccent{\`}{OT1}{30}
\DeclareTextAccent{\'}{OT1}{180}
\DeclareTextAccent{\^}{OT1}{25}

and other similar declarations. They work for Kerkis, but break other fonts that conform to the OT1 standard, in particular the Courier font that kerkis.sty declares as the monospaced font with

\renewcommand{\ttdefault}{pcr}

To the contrary, the T1 encoded Kerkis fonts follow the standard.

If you only use the serif and sans serif Kerkis fonts, OT1 is good; otherwise, always remember to do

\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}

in your documents using Kerkis.

| improve this answer | |

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