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My list of abbreviations is long so I need to add list of abbreviations with 4 columns before the introduction in a two column research article spanning over the whole page. I have tried nomenclature and its likes but they appear on the 1st column. Using \begin{table*}[h] displays my table on the top of the 2nd page. The closest I have come is using only \begin{tabular} but it is overwritten over the text of the 2nd column. I need something like this My desired output But what I get is this My actual output

The minimum working code is as under:

\documentclass[a4paper,fleqn]{cas-dc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}

\usepackage[numbers]{natbib}

\begin{document}
    \def\floatpagepagefraction{1}
    \def\textpagefraction{.001}
    \shorttitle{Article to be written}
    \shortauthors{abc et al}
    
    \title [mode = title]{An article to be written}
    
    \author[1-]{Abc wyz}[              orcid=NA]
    \fnmark[1]
    \cormark[1]
    \ead{abc@gmail.com}
    
    \author[1]{efg}
    \fnmark[2]
    \ead{efg@gmail.com}
    
    
    \address[1]{University of studies}
    
    \cortext[cor1]{Principal corresponding author}
    
    \begin{abstract}
        A common anti-skeptical argument is that if one knows nothing, one cannot know that one knows nothing, and so cannot exclude the possibility that one knows something after all. However, such an argument is only effective against the complete denial of the possibility of knowledge. Sextus argued that claims to either know or to not know were both dogmatic, and as such, Pyrrhonists claimed neither. Instead, they claimed to be continuing to search for something that might be knowable.

    \end{abstract}
    
        \begin{keywords}
        Home \sep
        Home \sep
    \end{keywords}
\maketitle

\begin{tabular}{|c|c|c|c|}
\hline
     sddsfsdfsdfsd & sscasdasdasdasdadfsfs & sdfsdsdfsdsd & sdfsfssadasdasdas  \\
     sdfsdsfsddf & sdfsdsfsddasdasdasdasdasfsd & sdfsd & sdfsfsdasdasdass\\
     \hline
\end{tabular}



    \section{Introduction}
    he works of Sextus Empiricus (c. 200 CE) are the main surviving account of ancient Pyrrhonism. By Sextus' time, the Academy had ceased to be skeptical. Sextus' empiricism was limited to the "absolute minimum" already mentioned—that there seem to be appearances. Sextus compiled and further developed the Pyrrhonists' skeptical arguments, most of which were directed against the Stoics but included arguments against all of the schools of Hellenistic philosophy, including the Academic skeptics.
\\
A common anti-skeptical argument is that if one knows nothing, one cannot know that one knows nothing, and so cannot exclude the possibility that one knows something after all. However, such an argument is only effective against the complete denial of the possibility of knowledge. Sextus argued that claims to either know or to not know were both dogmatic, and as such, Pyrrhonists claimed neither. Instead, they claimed to be continuing to search for something that might be knowable.
\\
Sextus, as the most systematic author of the works by Hellenistic sceptics which have survived, noted that there are at least ten modes of skepticism. These modes may be broken down into three categories: one may be skeptical of the subjective perceiver, of the objective world, and the relation between perceiver and the world.[15] His arguments are as follows.
\\
Subjectively, both the powers of the senses and of reasoning may vary among different people. And since knowledge is a product of one or the other, and since neither are reliable, knowledge would seem to be in trouble. For instance, a color-blind person sees the world quite differently from everyone else. Moreover, one cannot even give preference on the basis of the power of reason, i.e., by treating the rational animal as a carrier of greater knowledge than the irrational animal, since the irrational animal is still adept at navigating their environment, which suggests the ability to "know" about some aspects of the environment.
\\
Secondly, the personality of the individual might also influence what they observe, since (it is argued) preferences are based on sense-impressions, differences in preferences can be attributed to differences in the way that people are affected by the object. (Empiricus:56)
\\

\end{document}

The other necessary files for the code is available under the link http://mirrors.ctan.org/macros/latex/contrib/els-cas-templates.zip

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