0

I'm new to LaTex and I have encountered this problem. The word "og", "and" in English. Is made part of the code and is read as log or 1og. How do I add space??

\textlatin{\lambda_1}=-1 og \textlatin{\lambda_2}=1 og
9
  • you "escape" it like when you do \& to print &.
    – Plergux
    Nov 7 '20 at 13:06
  • Welcome to TeX.SE. Have you tried \mbox{ og }?
    – Mico
    Nov 7 '20 at 13:09
  • Is this used in a math context, e.g. inside of an equation environment? If so, use \text{og}.
    – leandriis
    Nov 7 '20 at 13:15
  • 1
    Probably you want the following output? i.stack.imgur.com/Xlblc.png This was created using \documentclass{article} \usepackage{amsmath} \begin{document} \[ \lambda_{1} = -1 \qquad\text{og}\qquad \lambda_{2} = 1 \] \end{document}.
    – leandriis
    Nov 7 '20 at 13:20
  • 1
    Please always provide a complete small example that shows the issue, you are asking how to change the spacing between the formula and the text but you have shown neither the text nor how you are marking up the formula. Nov 7 '20 at 13:33
2

I'm not sure where you found \textlatin. Anyway, in LaTeX you should specifically start and end math mode for inline formulas:

we see that \(\lambda_1=-1\) and \(\lambda_2=1\) are the eigenvalues

Such kind of input is independent of the language used, be it English, Norwegian (Bokmål or Nynorsk), Italian or what else (even right-to-left ones).

With \( you start math mode and the whole formula must be between \( and the matching \) that ends math mode. Consider them as “words” in a foreign language.

You may find the previous input typed in like

we see that $\lambda_1=-1$ and $\lambda_2=1$ are the eigenvalues

where $ is used both for starting and ending math mode.

Do yourself a favor and dedicate some time to read an introductory guide to LaTeX. A pretty good guide is “The not so short introduction to LaTeX”. It is not available in Norwegian, I'm afraid, nor in Danish. If you understand Danish, there is “Introduktion til LaTeX” by Lars Madsen (daleif).

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.