0

I am trying to make a table that continues to the next page so that I do not have any blank spaces created in the middle of the document.

However, when I use the long table environment, I get the following;

enter image description hereenter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{longtable}
\begin{document}


\section{Introduction}
\section{Internal Functioning}

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!


The following list gives a detailed description of each of this files.

\subsection{List of Program Components}

\subsubsection{alpha.py}

\textbf{Description:} 
sndmbfjherhfiuewhiu
skdjfiejijfiejfiojowejqo
ksnjhewiufhiwef
ksdnfjnaiefhie
ajksdnfiefiuej

\textbf{Modules used:} 123

\textbf{Functional Specifications of the Functions:}\medskip

\begin{longtable}{ | p{3cm} | p{10cm}| } 
\hline
\textbf{to} & kur\medskip

xmcnkdskjfakjfjkla;kslfk;lak;dslfklsd;k;alk;fekfoe \medskip

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!

The body is largely composed of water molecules. Each water molecule has two hydrogen nuclei or protons. MRI takes advantage of the high prevalence of hydrogen in the body and the magnetic properties of the proton in a hydrogen atom. Hydrogen atoms induce a small magnetic field due to the spin of this atom's proton. When a person goes inside the powerful magnetic field of the scanner, the magnetic moments (the measure of its tendency to align with a magnetic field) of some of these protons changes, and aligns with the direction of the field.

The magnetic field in an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is generated by surrounding a coil of wire with super cooling fluids (liquid helium and liquid nitrogen) lowering the temperature to about 10°K (-263°C or -441°F). Electrical current in the coil moves very fast creating the extremely large magnetic field.

kap(Integer, size -1)\medskip

\textbf{output}\par
theta\par
ppp\par
ooo\par
werwr\bigskip
kdkfjkrjeie\par
mdfmkerjoij\par
assad\\
\hline
\end{longtable}
\end{document}

How can I get the table to start on the first page and continue to the second page?

7
  • It is almost always better to set such things as a description list rather than a table, then page breaking is automatic. It is basically not possible using longtable. Nov 10 '20 at 23:19
  • is it not possible to make it tabular or rather just give it borders?
    – Jules
    Nov 10 '20 at 23:25
  • 2
    using tabular or longtable you would need to split it by hand making two table rows with teh second part of the long text in a separate row. )most tables look better without the vertical rules so not having those on a list is usually an improvement as well. Nov 10 '20 at 23:27
  • I'll just leave it as descriptions then. Thank you @DavidCarlisle
    – Jules
    Nov 10 '20 at 23:35
  • If you want something boxed that can split across pages, take a look at packages like tcolorbox.
    – Skillmon
    Nov 11 '20 at 7:31
0

It's a bit of a kludge, but you can do it with paracol. Note the \struts on the first and last lines. The first and last columns are only used to create vertical lines in the resulting \columnsep gaps.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{paracol}
\begin{document}


\section{Introduction}
\section{Internal Functioning}

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!


The following list gives a detailed description of each of this files.

\subsection{List of Program Components}

\subsubsection{alpha.py}

\textbf{Description:} 
sndmbfjherhfiuewhiu
skdjfiejijfiejfiojowejqo
ksnjhewiufhiwef
ksdnfjnaiefhie
ajksdnfiefiuej

\textbf{Modules used:} 123

\textbf{Functional Specifications of the Functions:}\medskip

\columnseprule=0.4pt
\setcolumnwidth{\dimexpr 0.5\columnseprule-0.5\columnsep,3cm,8cm}
\begin{paracol}{4}
\parindent=0pt
\switchcolumn[1]*[\hrule width\dimexpr11cm+2\columnsep+\columnseprule]
\strut\textbf{to}
\switchcolumn[2] 
\strut kur\medskip

xmcnkdskjfakjfjkla;kslfk;lak;dslfklsd;k;alk;fekfoe \medskip

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!

The body is largely composed of water molecules. Each water molecule has two hydrogen nuclei or protons. MRI takes advantage of the high prevalence of hydrogen in the body and the magnetic properties of the proton in a hydrogen atom. Hydrogen atoms induce a small magnetic field due to the spin of this atom's proton. When a person goes inside the powerful magnetic field of the scanner, the magnetic moments (the measure of its tendency to align with a magnetic field) of some of these protons changes, and aligns with the direction of the field.

The magnetic field in an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is generated by surrounding a coil of wire with super cooling fluids (liquid helium and liquid nitrogen) lowering the temperature to about 10°K (-263°C or -441°F). Electrical current in the coil moves very fast creating the extremely large magnetic field.

kap(Integer, size -1)\medskip

\textbf{output}\par
theta\par
ppp\par
ooo\par
werwr\bigskip
kdkfjkrjeie\par
mdfmkerjoij\par
assad\strut
\switchcolumn[1]*[\hrule width\dimexpr11cm+2\columnsep+\columnseprule]
\end{paracol}
\end{document}

This version creates environment mytabular to simplify application. Thie width of the first column is adjustable, and the second column fills the text area.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{paracol}

\newenvironment{mytabular}[1][3cm]% #1 = width of first column (optonal)
{\columnseprule=0.4pt
  \setcolumnwidth{\dimexpr 0.5\columnseprule-0.5\columnsep\relax,
    #1,
    \dimexpr \textwidth-#1-2\columnsep-2\columnseprule\relax,
    \dimexpr 0.5\columnseprule-0.5\columnsep\relax}%
  \parindent=0pt
  \def\hline{\switchcolumn[1]*[\hrule width\textwidth]}%
  \begin{paracol}{4}}%
{\end{paracol}}
  
\begin{document}

\section{Introduction}
\section{Internal Functioning}

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!


The following list gives a detailed description of each of this files.

\subsection{List of Program Components}

\subsubsection{alpha.py}

\textbf{Description:} 
sndmbfjherhfiuewhiu
skdjfiejijfiejfiojowejqo
ksnjhewiufhiwef
ksdnfjnaiefhie
ajksdnfiefiuej

\textbf{Modules used:} 123

\textbf{Functional Specifications of the Functions:}\medskip

\begin{mytabular}
\hline
\strut\textbf{to}
\switchcolumn
\strut kur\medskip

xmcnkdskjfakjfjkla;kslfk;lak;dslfklsd;k;alk;fekfoe \medskip

Magnetism is a property of matter that is a result of the orbiting electrons in atoms. The orbiting electrons cause the atoms to have a magnetic moment associated with an intrinsic angular momentum called spin. Spin will be discussed in more detail a little bit further down. It's convenient to imagine the electron spinning on its axis with the up and down orientations. However, in reality the electron is not physically spinning!

The body is largely composed of water molecules. Each water molecule has two hydrogen nuclei or protons. MRI takes advantage of the high prevalence of hydrogen in the body and the magnetic properties of the proton in a hydrogen atom. Hydrogen atoms induce a small magnetic field due to the spin of this atom's proton. When a person goes inside the powerful magnetic field of the scanner, the magnetic moments (the measure of its tendency to align with a magnetic field) of some of these protons changes, and aligns with the direction of the field.

The magnetic field in an magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner is generated by surrounding a coil of wire with super cooling fluids (liquid helium and liquid nitrogen) lowering the temperature to about 10°K (-263°C or -441°F). Electrical current in the coil moves very fast creating the extremely large magnetic field.

kap(Integer, size -1)\medskip

\textbf{output}\par
theta\par
ppp\par
ooo\par
werwr\bigskip
kdkfjkrjeie\par
mdfmkerjoij\par
assad\strut
\hline
\end{mytabular}
\end{document}
2
  • it's a bit messy and the page break looks very abrupt but it's the closest I have gotten to extending the table.
    – Jules
    Nov 12 '20 at 20:29
  • The version with mytabular environment is more helpful. Now, I can control the column width and edit it according to convenience, Thank you.
    – Jules
    Nov 13 '20 at 15:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.