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Is there a way to determine the type of atom assigned by TeX to a given mathematical symbol? For example, I suspect that both \exists and \forall are "type 1" math atoms (namely, operators), but I am thinking "mathematically" in this case.

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    Related: What does \mathchar do?
    – Werner
    Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 19:32
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    Both \exists and \forall are ordinary math symbols. See section 38.3.3 <mathchardef tokens>: ordinary symbols (p 305) in TeX by Topic.
    – Werner
    Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 19:34
  • Now that @Werner posted that link, take a look at the definition of, e.g., \exists. That one is \mathchar"239, so it is of family 2 and symbol 39<sb>16</sb>. So it is not assigned class 1 (that would be a place befor "239). Compare \mathchar"239 a to \mathchar"1239 a to see the difference.
    – Skillmon
    Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 19:36
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    It's much simpler to do \texttt{\meaning\exists}, which yields \mathchar"239 and interpreting the definition.
    – egreg
    Commented Nov 20, 2020 at 17:09

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