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I noticed that viewing the documents I compile with latex on the Adobe Acrobat viewer, the result seems to be higher quality - i.e. the characters look more defined, somewhat more "crisp" - than with other viewers like Preview. I wonder if this is due to a particular interaction between TeX and Adobe Acrobat and if anything can be done about it, or even if it's just my imagination.

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    Displaying characters on a screen is in fact a very complicated task. So-called "anti-aliasing" algorithms have to be used and all the PDF viewers don't use the same algorithms and that's why a given PDF will seem to be displayed differently, even on a same computer. Since Adobe was the creator the PDF format, it's not surprising that Adobe Reader is nowadays considered by some people as one of the best PDF viewers. Nov 26, 2020 at 19:14
  • Interesting. Do you have any comment on other viewers that might be achieve a similar display quality without feeling bloated? On a related note: is the standard output of latex or pidflatex already at the highest possible resolution, or is it possible to "tell" latex to output at a higher [email protected]
    – Karl
    Nov 26, 2020 at 19:51
  • I've enjoyed the quality provided by SumatraPDF.
    – Werner
    Nov 26, 2020 at 20:19
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    @Karl: Excepted if you do a very bad manipulation, all the characters (in fact the glyphs) are defined by mathematical curves and not by pixels nowadays. So, at least for the text, the resolution is maximal. Nov 26, 2020 at 20:29
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    @Karl: There are many PDF viewers, by in fact all of them have to use a PDF renderer. Writing a PDF renderer is a very hard task (the norm of the PDF occupy a book of 1000 pages). So, in fact, there is very few PDF renderers : MuPDF (used by Sumatra PDF for example), PDFium (used by Chromium for example) and, of course, the renderer of Adobe (in the products of Adobe). In fact, I think that these renderers are good. If you prefer Adobe Reader than Sumatra PDF (for instance), I think that it's a question of taste... Nov 26, 2020 at 20:34

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