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I found a PhD thesis using a math font I did not know yet:

enter image description here

I know these: \mathbb{}, \mathcal{}, \mathfrak{}, \mathscr{}, \mathsf{}, \EuScript{}, but none of these match the symbols above. Help me expand my library of symbols I can use!! :D

EDIT: Now I want to know how to make a new command in this font, without 'overwriting' the above commands. For example if I use \mathcalpxtx{XUY}, I will end up with the XUY in the image above. I tried to do this with this question, but I actually don't understand how this declare operator works...

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  • A good set of font specimens, with instructions for how to use them, is here.
    – Davislor
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:26
  • You will rarely if ever want to use two different calligraphic alphabets in an actual math paper. Mathematicians who do would usually make them very distinct styles, such as a chancery-style alphabet as \mathcal and a script-style alphabet (what mathalpha calls “embellished”) as \mathscr.
    – Davislor
    Dec 4, 2020 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

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This seems to be the calligraphic font often used with Times or Palatino clones. You can set \mathcal to this font with the option cal=pxtx from mathalpha, as in the following example.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[cal=pxtx]{mathalpha}
\begin{document}
\(\mathcal{XUY}\)
\end{document}

If you want to keep using the default calligraphic font as well, you can define the new alphabet without loading mathalpha and associate it with another command than \mathcal. To define the new alphabet, you can take the relevant lines directly from mathalpha's code.

\documentclass{article}
\DeclareFontFamily{U}{txcal}{\skewchar \font =45}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{txcal}{m}{n}{<-> txr-cal}{}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcalpxtx}{U}{txcal}{m}{n}
\begin{document}
\(\mathcal{XUY}\mathcalpxtx{XUY}\)
\end{document}
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  • 1
    Or possibly txupr for the less-slanted version.
    – Davislor
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:25
  • This is exactly what I'm looking for. Note to other readers of this question. The math alpha package provides quite a number of alternative fonts for the commands I mentioned in my question!
    – seaver
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:28
  • @Davislor maybe, but from the OP's picture I think it is really the italic version.
    – Vincent
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:34
  • @seaver indeed! This package is very easy to use, and its documentation is very helpful.
    – Vincent
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:34
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    @seaver I edited my answer to add another solution that should work.
    – Vincent
    Dec 4, 2020 at 16:34

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