2

Against my better judgement, I've spent far more time than I have available to accommodate printing guidelines for a self-published booklet. The booklet is a half-letter size page. In some cases, an image should cover the entire half page + bleed, and in some cases, it should only cover the full half page.

I read several helpful posts (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) and have kept sage advice and warnings about self publishing in mind. I solved my issues (I think?) thanks to the above posts & package docs.

But, out of curiosity, here are several method I tried, with screenshots. I'd like to understand the discrepancies between them. I found some similar information at this post, which suggests a kernel update to LaTeX could be the underlying issue in the ways different packages calculate.

I would appreciate any feedback and/or corrections to the code below. The first two results are what I wanted to achieve.

(All the posts below are using a test image.)

Method 1: textpos with grid points. The image is placed at the edges of the half page, with a 1/8" background bleed around the top, left, and right edges. The gray is the background of my pdf viewer. The white is the bleed. The grid is graph paper, not the grid points in textpos.

Image with 1/8" bleed using textpos grid points

\documentclass[reqno,10pt]{article}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usepackage{comment}
\usepackage[pages=some,placement=top]{background}
\usepackage[paperwidth=5.75in, paperheight=8.75in, top=0.25in, bottom=0.25in, left=0.25in, right=0.25in]{geometry}  % 5.5 x 8.5 w/1/8" bleed
\usepackage[absolute]{textpos}
\setlength{\TPHorizModule}{0.125in}
\setlength{\TPVertModule}{\TPHorizModule}

\begin{document}

\begin{textblock}{44}(1,1)
    \noindent \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}
\end{textblock}

\null

\vfill

\begin{flushright}
    \small
    (Artist Credits go here)
\end{flushright}

Method 2: the same as Method 1 using absolute dimensions with textpos. Renders the same result.

\begin{textblock*}{5.5in}(0.125in,0.125in)
    \noindent \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}
\end{textblock*}

Method 3: Using tikz. This code was borrowed from a post I can no longer find. I have no idea why the image is placed where it is.

enter image description here

\begin{tikzpicture}[remember picture]
    \node[anchor=north west, %anchor is upper left corner of the graphic
    xshift=0in, %shifting around
    yshift=0in] 
    at (current page.north west) %left upper corner of the page
    {\includegraphics[width=5.5in]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}}; 
\end{tikzpicture}

\begin{flushright}
    \small
    (Artist Credits go here)
\end{flushright}

Method 4: Using minipage just to see where the image would begin. I tried to use hspace, vspace, hoffset, voffset to move it back to the edge of the page (not including the bleed), and it gave me even more strange results.

enter image description here

\mbox{
    \begin{minipage}{\paperwidth}
    \noindent \includegraphics[width=5.5in]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}
\end{minipage}
}

\begin{flushright}
    \small
    (Artist Credits go here)
\end{flushright}

Method 5: Using background. The positioning is way off. I changed the nodeanchor to north west corner of the page, and that did not compute correctly either. Also, I used the scale option in includegraphics, because absolute dimensions do not work, as shown in Method 6. Scaling comes close but not exactly to the page dimensions.

enter image description here

\backgroundsetup{
    opacity=1,
    vshift={-0.125in},
    contents={\includegraphics[scale=0.036]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}}}
\BgThispage

\null

\vfill

\begin{flushright}
    \small
    (Artist Credits go here)
\end{flushright}

Method 6: Using the absolute width in includegraphics inside background produces a huge enlargement.

enter image description here

\backgroundsetup{
    opacity=1, 
    contents={\includegraphics[width=5.5in]{../../exercises/images/force_diagram}}}
\BgThispage

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.