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No matter where I try to edit it, on overleaf or downloading it from the journal link and work on it on some editor on my computer, if I don't remove the \ead{} and \fntext{} for the authors when using the cas-sc-template of Elsevier. I get the following warning:

`h' float specifier changed to `ht'.

Why is this? Previously I only have seen this warning for figures and tables. And more importantly, what is the solution? What should I do in order to get rid of this warning in a proper way?

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  • This is normal behaviour. If you use [h] and the float cannot be placed here (about), then the list is empty and thus cannot be placed anywhere. So by default [h] is always interpreted as [ht]. In general never use just [h] use at least [htp] then it has more possibilities to place the float.
    – daleif
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 13:37
  • Because h is to limited. For example, where should be float, if there, where is inserted in text, no enough space for it? So with ht you tell LateX, that it is preferable to have float where is inserted, but if this is not possible let it be on the top of the next page.
    – Zarko
    Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 13:37
  • @daleif and @Zarko I haven't used [h] in any place in my tex. If there is anything, it should be with the template which is not designed by me (cas-sc.sty). Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 14:18
  • Please, make a small compilable example that shows the warning Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 14:18
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    The template contains the line \begin{table}[width=.9\linewidth,cols=4,pos=h]. Change pos=h to pos=ht and the warning will go away. Commented Feb 4, 2021 at 14:26

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The template at Overleaf contains the line (line 231, in the current version):

\begin{table}[width=.9\linewidth,cols=4,pos=h]

The pos option in the els-cas template is the same as LaTeX's standard optional argument to floating environments (like table and figure). Change pos=h to pos=ht and the warning will vanish:

\begin{table}[width=.9\linewidth,cols=4,pos=ht]

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