2

Here's a simple fraction that I find extremely ugly. What could I do to get a better looking result (without using a negative exponent) ?

\documentclass[11pt,letterpaper,twoside]{book}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[total={6in,10in},left=1.5in,top=0.5in,includehead,includefoot]{geometry}
\usepackage{microtype}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{tensor}

\begin{document}

TEST
\begin{equation}
    a(t) = \frac{g}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)^{\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{equation}

\end{document}

Preview:

enter image description here

Of course, I could use 3/2 instead of \frac{3}{2}, but I believe the result is worst. I tried \displaystyle and \textstyle for the bottom part of the fraction, but the exponent is still creating the trouble. So what would you do to get a better looking fraction with its pesky exponent, without writing everything at the numerator with a negative exponent?

4
  • 2
    There's no way to remove that white space, because the exponent is higher than the parenthesis: this is exactly why you should use 3/2. Lowering the exponent would be much worse. – egreg Mar 1 at 17:55
  • @SandyG, the second line of my question is excluding this option. – Cham Mar 12 at 1:16
  • Sorry. Didn't see that. – Sandy G Mar 12 at 2:24
  • Problem solved? – Dr. Manuel Kuehner May 17 at 1:14
3

A couple of suggestions

enter image description here

\documentclass[11pt,letterpaper,twoside]{book}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[total={6in,10in},left=1.5in,top=0.5in,includehead,includefoot]{geometry}
\usepackage{microtype}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{tensor}

\begin{document}

TEST
\begin{equation}
    a(t) = \frac{g}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)^{\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{equation}

TEST2
\begin{equation}
    a(t) = \frac{g}{(1 + (g t / c)^2)^{\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{equation}


TEST3
\begin{equation}
    a(t) = \frac{g}{(1 + (g t / c)^2)^{\scriptscriptstyle\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{equation}

\end{document}
2
  • I just found that smashing the "big" parenthesis helps a lot. The double same-sized parenthesis isn't good looking, in my opinion. You could add the smashing option as a TEST4. – Cham Mar 1 at 18:17
  • @Cham I wondered about smash, but I don't think I'd ever use big delimiters here irrespective of the fraction and superscript. – David Carlisle Mar 1 at 18:49
3

Perhaps this hack with bigstrut will befit you?

\documentclass[11pt,letterpaper,twoside]{book}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage[total={6in,10in},left=1.5in,top=0.5in,includehead,includefoot]{geometry}
\usepackage{microtype}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{mathtools}
\usepackage{bigstrut}
\newcommand{\mybigstrut}[1] {{\setlength{\bigstrutjot}{#1}\bigstrut[b]}}

\begin{document}

TEST

\begin{equation}
    a(t) = \frac{g_{\mybigstrut{5pt}}}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)^{\!\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{equation}

\end{document} 

enter image description here

2

One approach is to move the exponent out from the denominator and reposition it accordingly. I used \! to move it left a bit, and then either raisebox to lower it by trial and error or genfrac to have the exponent in a phantom denominator.

\documentclass[11pt]{amsart}

\begin{document}

\begin{align*}
\text{original: }&a(t) = \frac{g}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)^{\frac{3}{2}}}.\\
\text{raisebox: }&a(t) = \frac{g}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)}\!\raisebox{-.5ex}{$\scriptstyle\frac{3}{2}$}.\\
\text{genfrac: }&a(t) = \frac{g}{\bigl(1 + (g t / c)^2 \bigr)}\!\genfrac{}{}{0pt}{0}{}{{}^{\frac{3}{2}}}.
\end{align*}

\end{document}

pdf output

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.