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How can I add a microgram mark in LaTeX?

Because I want to add microgram in my work as a description of a specific unit.

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    Take look at siunitx package Commented Apr 10, 2021 at 9:20
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    Welcome to TeX.SE.
    – Mico
    Commented Apr 10, 2021 at 9:28
  • You're probably using one of the UTF-8 capable TeXs (e.g. XeLaTeX) anyway, right? So what's the problem with just typing "µg"?
    – AndreKR
    Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 11:24
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    @AndreKR That depends on font coverage for appearance in output, plus there is still the whole issue of units being mathematical and so not responsive to bold/italic/...
    – Joseph Wright
    Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

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The siunitx package provides two macros that address your typesetting needs: \si and \SI.

For more information on how scientific units should be typeset according to the Système Inernational (SI) conventions, please see the NIST's SI Unit rules and style conventions.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{siunitx}
\begin{document}
\si{\micro\gram}, \SI{1.23}{\milli\gram}
\end{document}

Addendum to pick up on @leandriis's follow-up comment: The siunitx package provides the abbreviations \fg, \pg, \ng, \ug, \mg, \g and \kg for -- you guessed it -- femtogram, picogram, nanogram, microgram, milligram, gram, and kilogram. See the multi-page Table 21 of package's user guide for the full details.

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    siunitx by default also loads a number of abbreviated versions of units, so instead of \micro\gram, one can also use \ug.
    – leandriis
    Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 10:40
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    @leandriis - Thanks. I've edited my answer to provide an addendum, in which I mention that the siunitx package provides various macros, such as \ug, for "abbreviated units".
    – Mico
    Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 10:58
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    From version 3 of siunitx the recommended approach is to now use \qty{<number>}{<unit>}. So this answer would become \qty{1.23}{\ug} Commented Oct 3, 2021 at 0:54
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As @Juan Castaño noted in a comment, it's perhaps best to use the siunitx package for this sort of thing. You could of course use $\mu$, but I'm not sure if that's good typographic practice (likely not).

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{siunitx}
\begin{document}
\verb+\mu+: 100 $\mu$g

\verb+siunitx+: \SI{100}{\micro\gram}
\end{document}

enter image description here

EDIT: well, looks like @Mico beat me to answering. ;)

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    The use of $\mu$g is definitely not encouraged by the powers-that-be, unless the letter "mu" is typeset in an upright font face (which isn't the case in your example).
    – Mico
    Commented Apr 10, 2021 at 9:37
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    @Israa it'd be best if you posted an actual new question, not just a comment on an answer.
    – chsk
    Commented Apr 10, 2021 at 14:36
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    Being a professional typographer myself (I know; rare breed!), I’d indeed advise against $ \mu $g because then it’s in italics, but $ \text{\mu} $g would be OK. Commented Apr 10, 2021 at 23:57
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    @PierrePaquette except that \text{\mu} would give an error because \mu can't be used in text mode.
    – L. F.
    Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 4:05
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    Oh! Then what about just \text{µ}? The character could be copy/pasted from an external source, or composed with certain keyboard settings (I use Canadian–French Multilingual on a MacBook Air, and it’s alt/option-m). Commented Apr 11, 2021 at 4:09

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