2

Consider following MWE :

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}
\newtheorem{fruit}{Definition of a kind of fruit}

\begin{document}

Let's define some fruits. But first some text to reach till the right margin and even a little further.

\begin{fruit}[{Banana, as found in the book \cite[chapter 31]{ref1}}]
A banana is a yellow fruit that grows on a tree.
\end{fruit}

\begin{thebibliography}{9}
  \bibitem{ref1}  O. Outan. The big book of bananas. Fruit Editions Ltd.
\end{thebibliography}

\end{document}

which yields

enter image description here

As you see, the definition name

[{Banana, as found in the book \cite[chapter 31]{ref1}}]

contains a citation and therefore, the entire name has been placed between {} in order to avoid an error. It turns out that an overhang is obtained. Is there a straightforward way to obtain a line break here?

Update

  • I would like the first line of the theorem to be justified text.

  • In this case, would it possible to split inside the citation?

    ................................... [1,

    chapter 31]. A banana is

1
  • 1
    amsmath isn't involved here Jun 20, 2021 at 15:48

1 Answer 1

3

amsmath isn't involved in theorem definitions but the AMS package amsthm does provided an extended theorem declaration that allows line breaking here.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsthm}
\newtheorem{fruit}{Definition of a kind of fruit}

\begin{document}

Let's define some fruits. But first some text to reach till the right margin and even a little further.

\begin{fruit}[{Banana, as found in the book\\ \cite[chapter 31]{ref1}}]
A banana is a yellow fruit that grows on a tree.
\end{fruit}

\begin{thebibliography}{9}
  \bibitem{ref1}  O. Outan. The big book of bananas. Fruit Editions Ltd.
\end{thebibliography}

\end{document}
2
  • OK. See updated question for more details.
    – Karlo
    Jun 20, 2021 at 16:05
  • In this case, the title is not bold anymore, and the title is no longer justified text.
    – Karlo
    Aug 20, 2021 at 14:10

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