2

I need the following symbol: enter image description here

I tried with:

\SI[]{5.73}{\per\deg}

But I want the negative power!

Can you help me?

6
  • 1
    Just a curiosity. Where have you seen deg^-1 and what is the significance?
    – Sebastiano
    Jul 13 at 19:37
  • 1
    \qty{30}{deg^{-1}} (using siunitx v3), however, as said @Sebastiano, what is meaning/ significance of this unit?
    – Zarko
    Jul 13 at 19:59
  • I have to use it to indicate the slope of lift coefficient.
    – Giuseppe
    Jul 13 at 20:00
  • For example 5.4 1/deg.
    – Giuseppe
    Jul 13 at 20:00
  • @Giuseppe Looking on Wikipedia I see, lift slope is π^2/90 ≃ 0.11 per degree. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lift_coefficient
    – Sebastiano
    Jul 13 at 20:07
4

The desired behavior is the default bahavior but it does not seem to be working for \deg. However, if you manually declare the unit

\DeclareSIUnit{\deg}{deg}

it seems to work just fine:

enter image description here

Code:

\documentclass[12pt]{article}

\usepackage{siunitx}
\DeclareSIUnit{\deg}{deg}% <-- No exponent if this is not inclued

\begin{document}
$\SI{5.73}{\per\deg}$
\end{document}
3
  • Great! Thank you very much!
    – Giuseppe
    Jul 13 at 23:25
  • 1
    I think \deg doesn't work as expected here is because it isn't actually a unit defined by siunitx. \deg is just the LaTeX default degree function (like \exp). With \DeclareSIUnit{\deg}{deg} you turn \deg into a siunitx unit.
    – moewe
    Jul 14 at 4:32
  • @moewe: Ahhh, that makes sense. Thanks for the explanantion. Jul 14 at 8:46

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