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Probably something that has been asked before, I just can't seem to find it.

Currently using these packages:

\usepackage[margin=2cm]{geometry}
\usepackage{setspace}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{wrapfig}
\usepackage{caption}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{gensymb}
\usepackage{amsmath}[fleqn]
\usepackage{lipsum}
\usepackage{cases}
\usepackage{enumitem}
\usepackage{apacite}
\usepackage{chemist}
\usepackage{chemfig}

\usepackage{accents}
\usepackage{mathabx}
\begin{document}
$n \in \mathbb{Z}^{+}$
\end{document}

The $\in$ symbol just doesn't look good. Are there any alternatives?

Looks like this: enter image description here

Ideally I would be able to only change the \in symbol and nothing else

4
  • 1
    Would be better if you include a minimal working example, not just the preamble.
    – user202729
    Commented Dec 31, 2021 at 15:25
  • 4
    you should show an example with x\in X or similar and say what you do not like. None of the code that you posted is related to your question except \usepackage{mathabx} if you do not like the mathabx font pick a different one, there are dozens of math fonts available. Commented Dec 31, 2021 at 15:26
  • it is hard to tell from your image but if your \in is pixilated from a bitmap font make sure you have the type1 mathabx fonts installed see tex.stackexchange.com/q/628321/1090 Commented Dec 31, 2021 at 16:09

1 Answer 1

3

Using a more reasonable test document without the unrelated packages:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
$n \in \mathbb{Z}^{+}$
\end{document}

With \usepackage{amsfonts,mathabx}

enter image description here

With \usepackage{amsfonts}

enter image description here

With \usepackage{stix2}

enter image description here

With \usepackage{newtxmath}

enter image description here

There are dozens more math fonts available and no purely objective way of choosing between them. Note however that a font is a collective combined work of design, you should almost always choose an entire math font not select different fonts for different symbols.

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