1
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{alignat}{1}
a ={}& b \left( c \left( \frac{d}{e} + f \right) + \notag\\
& g \left( \frac{h}{i} + j \right) \right)
\end{alignat}
\end{document}

I think this code doesn't compile because the first \left( and the last \right) are in different lines, which LaTeX obviously considers two different equations.

Is there a clean way to get it running while still making use of the automatic scaling provided by \left( \right)?

5
  • 1
    Short answer: No.
    – Mico
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:19
  • 1
    @Mico Short response: Thanks.
    – MaxD
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:21
  • You need no \left and \right with those terms. May you please make a “real world” example?
    – egreg
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:25
  • 1
    @egreg I'm trying to write equations that are half a page long at most. Didn't think it would matter, but I can make it more "real word" (while also less "minimal" ofc).
    – MaxD
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:26
  • @egreg updated, hope its usable now
    – MaxD
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:30

1 Answer 1

2

Two possible solutions:

  • with use of \left(, \right) (see use of right. and left., and
  • with use of \biggl( and \biggr):
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{alignat}{1}
a ={}& b \left( c \left( \frac{d}{e} + f \right) + \notag \right.\\
& \left.g \left( \frac{h}{i} + j \right) \right)
\end{alignat}

\begin{alignat}{1}
a ={}& b \biggl( c \left( \frac{d}{e} + f \right) + \notag \\
& g \left( \frac{h}{i} + j \right) \biggr)
\end{alignat}
\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • I was aware of option 2, but not of option 1. Unfortunately still some manual fiddling involved, but if this is as good as it's gonna get, I'll take it. Thanks!
    – MaxD
    Feb 11, 2022 at 15:59

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