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Normally, I could write H20 with \chemfig{H-[:30]O-[:-30]H} which produces:enter image description here

Beautiful! Now, If I try to add a delta symbol as an exponent, it becomes messy and the bonds does not point to the atoms, instead it points to the exponents!

enter image description here

How could I possible fix it so the bonds points to the atoms?

Adding pipe | to the atoms, \chemfig{H^{+\delta}|-[:30]O^{-\delta}|-[:-30]H^{+\delta}}, kind of solves this but the atoms disappeared:enter image description here

3 Answers 3

4

You can use \charge:

enter image description here

Code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{chemfig}

\begin{document}
\chemfig{H-[:30]O-[:-30]H}

\chemfig{H-[:30]\charge{45:1.5pt=$\scriptstyle-\delta$}{O}-[:-30]H}
\end{document}
1
  • Sweet! I had to tweak it a little bit, \charge{90:1.5pt=$\scriptstyle+\delta$}{H}-[:30]\charge{90:1.5pt=$\scriptstyle-\delta$}{O}-[:-30,,1]\charge{80:1.5pt=$\scriptstyle+\delta$}{H}. I didn't know it was possible to put the delta just above the atom so I did it. Feb 18, 2022 at 12:56
2

You could try, \chemfig{H|^{+\delta}-[:30,,1]O|^{-\delta}-[:-30,,1]H^{+\delta}}

enter image description here

1

To place a symbol above the atom, use the command \chemabove

In chemistry textbooks, \delta^+ is written instead of +\delta.

\documentclass[margin={5mm 5mm}]{standalone}
\usepackage{chemfig}

\begin{document}

\chemfig{\chemabove{H}{\delta^{+}}-[:30]\chemabove{O}{\delta^{-}}-[:-30]\chemabove{H}{\delta^{+}}}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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