2

This MWE code

\documentclass[12pt]{book}
\usepackage{pstricks,psvectorian}
\usepackage{color}

% Compiles with XELATEX
\begin{document}
\thispagestyle{empty}

\begin{pspicture}(-5,-5)(4,4)%
\psframe[fillcolor=red!65!black,fillstyle=solid](-5,-5)(5,12) 
\psframe[linecolor=red!65!black](-5,-5)(5,12)

% oiseaux
\rput[tr]{-30}(-1.3,3){\psvectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}}

\bfseries %But---THIS DOES NOT appear to make the following image bold.
\rput[tr]{-30}(-1.3,1){\psvectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}}
\end{pspicture}%
\end{document}

produces the following

enter image description here

I have attempted to make the second image bold by use of the \bfseries command, but as you can see---it does not appear to effect the desired outcome. (Incidentally, \textbf produced an error, which is probably not surprising.)

How may I invoke a psvectorian image and have it displayed more prominently (i.e., in bold) than that which is produced, in this case, by \psvectorian{57}?

3
  • \bfseries is for text, while this is a drawing, so the command does not modify the drawing in any way. Postscript (the language used to make the drawings) does have a line width parameter, however the vectorian images are not drawn as lines but as filled curves, which do not have a line width either. So the only thing you can do is to either overprint the image with a small offset (put the figure two times, at (-1.3,3) and at (-1.3,3.02) for example) which does not look very nice, or add emphasis using a different color or a different size.
    – Marijn
    Mar 25, 2022 at 20:39
  • contour package gives the effect of bolder if the same colour is used; or \llap with an offset. See tex.stackexchange.com/questions/27843/…
    – Cicada
    Mar 26, 2022 at 13:33
  • Correction: contour package works on fonts, not PostScript commands. A possible \llap solution is given in the answer, but results detract from the image's design.
    – Cicada
    Mar 27, 2022 at 8:23

2 Answers 2

3
\documentclass[12pt]{book}
\usepackage{pstricks,psvectorian}

\makeatletter
\def\psBoldVectorian{\@ifnextchar[\psBoldVectorian@i{\psBoldVectorian@i[]}}
\def\psBoldVectorian@i[#1]#2{%
  \rput(0,0){\psvectorian[#1]{#2}}%
  \rput(0.4pt,0.4pt){\psvectorian[#1]{#2}}%
  \rput(-0.4pt,-0.4pt){\psvectorian[#1]{#2}}%
}
\makeatother
\thispagestyle{empty}
\begin{document}

\begin{pspicture}(-5,-5)(4,4)%
\psframe[fillcolor=red!65!black,fillstyle=solid](-5,-5)(5,12) 
\psframe[linecolor=red!65!black](-5,-5)(5,12)

% oiseaux
\rput{-30}(-1.3,3){\psvectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}}
\rput{-30}(-1.3,1){\psBoldVectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}}
\end{pspicture}%
\end{document}

enter image description here

3

A kind of fake bold can be simulated by putting the drawing twice, here with an overlap in the same colour, plus a small kern, and very slightly larger width.

fake bold

MWE

\documentclass[12pt]{book}
\usepackage{pstricks,psvectorian}
\usepackage{xcolor}

% Compiles with XELATEX
\begin{document}
\thispagestyle{empty}

\begin{pspicture}(-5,-5)(4,4)%
\psframe[fillcolor=red!65!black,fillstyle=solid](-5,-5)(5,12) 
\psframe[linecolor=red!65!black](-5,-5)(5,12)

% oiseaux
\rput[tr]{-30}(-1.3,3){\psvectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}}

\rput[tr]{-30}(-1.3,1){\psvectorian[width=2.1cm,color=white]{57}\kern0.45pt\llap{\psvectorian[width=2.12cm,color=white]{57}}}
\end{pspicture}%
\end{document}

A two-colour solution is at: How to Fill a Psvectorian Ornament with Color


The drawing is designed to emulate fine penmanship, so black strokes on white background, and no further emphasis is required.

bw

Altering the composition's design breaks the fine detail.

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