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I am struggling with placing an H right beside my O. I don't want any dash between the O and H; just them beside each other.

Here is a photo of what I want:

enter image description here

Here is a photo of what I attempted:

enter image description here

Here is the code for what I attempted:

\chemfig{\charge{-90=\: , -90:5pt=\scriptsize $ + $}{O}(H)(-[-4]3R)([2]-P(-[0]Br)(-[-4]Br))}

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

2 Answers 2

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I found out you don't need the parenthesis around the oxygen.

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{chemfig}

\begin{document}
\chemfig{\charge{-90=\: , -90:5pt=\scriptsize $ + $}{O}H(-[-4]3R)([2]-P(-[0]Br)(-[-4]Br))}
\end{document}

Corrected molecule

1
  • Perfect! Thank you
    – big_armpit
    Mar 28, 2022 at 3:43
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There are a few possible ways to do this. Joshua González showed the easiest and simplest to do.

But there are other ways you can choose if you need to.

You can use the command \charge or use an "invisible binding"

OBS: [-4] don't make sense, use [4], and use the binding before the spatial direction ([2]- is wrong, use -[2])

\chemfig{\charge{270=\:,270:5pt=\scriptsize$+$,0:2pt=H}{O}(-[4]3R)(-[2]P(-[0]Br)(-[4]Br))}
    
    \chemfig{\charge{270=\:,270:5pt=\scriptsize$+$}{O}(-[0,.25,,,,draw=none]H)(-[4]3R)(-[2]P(-[0]Br)(-[4]Br))}

enter image description here

1
  • Interesting solution! Thank you!
    – big_armpit
    Mar 28, 2022 at 3:44

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