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I need to be able to use unicode symbol #643 (or something very similar) in mathmode. It looks like a small integral sign and is contained as \textesh in the tipa package, but I can't use it in mathmode. Using it within a \text{} environment interprets it as a normal $S$, and I cannot always exit mathmode when I need the sign. How can I solve this problem?

2 Answers 2

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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tipa}
\begin{document}
\textesh
$\textrm{\textesh}$
\end{document}

enter image description here

I note also that, despite the OP's assertion, using $\text{\textesh}$ with the amsmath package loaded also succeeds at getting the proper glyph.

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With tipa in PDFLaTeX:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{tipa}
\usepackage{amsmath, amssymb}

\newcommand\mathesh{\textup{\textesh}}

\begin{document}
\section*{The symbol \(\mathesh\)}

Let \(\mathesh \in \mathbb{R}\).
\end{document}

Computer Modern sample

And a version that uses Unicode fonts, rather than tipa:

\documentclass{article}
\tracinglostchars=3
\usepackage[default]{fontsetup} % Loads New Computer Modern and unicode-math.

\DeclareTextSymbol{\textesh}{TU}{"0283}
\newcommand\mathesh{\textup{\textesh}}

\begin{document}
\section*{The symbol \(\mathesh\)}

Let \(\mathesh \in \mathbb{R}\).
\end{document}

If you need to use a font for your IPA symbols that’s different from your main font, replace the \DeclareTextSymbol command with something like:

\newfontfamily\ipafont{Charis SIL}[Scale=MatchUppercase]
\newcommand\textesh{{\ipafont\symbol{"0283}}}

You could also use the tipauni package, or there are some OpenType math fonts, such as XITS Math, which contain this symbol.

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