1

I would like to highlight some words in an example block using the same color that is used for definitions and bullet points. Is this color saved as a variable name by Beamer, and can it be accessed via a \color{} command?

I'm aware of this question, and it will work as a work-around. But I was hoping there would be some way to define the spot color so that it would automatically change if I decided to change themes. My dream is that somewhere under the hood, something like examplebulletcolor has been defined and I can just use a command like {\color{examplebulletcolor} text} to get the spot color for any theme I want.

An example, and how it renders on my machine, is below. I would like the words "sign" and the phrase "nuclear semiotics" to appear in the same green color as the word "Semiotics" and the bullets.

\documentclass{beamer}

\usetheme{Berkeley}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}

  \begin{exampleblock}{Nuclear semiotics}
    \begin{description}
    \item[Semiotics:]  The study of {signs} and how they convey
      meaning.
    \end{description}
    \begin{itemize}
    \item A {sign} is anything that can communicate something:
      spoken/written language, but also art, body language, maps,
      design\dots
    \item {Nuclear semiotics} studied since the 1980s 
    \end{itemize}
    
  \end{exampleblock}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

1 Answer 1

2

You can use the example text.fg colour:

\documentclass{beamer}

\usetheme{Berkeley}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}

  \begin{exampleblock}{Nuclear semiotics}
    \begin{description}
    \item[Semiotics:]  The study of {signs} and how they convey
      meaning.
    \end{description}
    \begin{itemize}
    \item A {sign} is anything that can communicate something:
      spoken/written language, but also art, body language, maps,
      design\dots
    \item {Nuclear semiotics}   \textcolor{example text.fg}{some text} since the 1980s 
    \end{itemize}
    
  \end{exampleblock}
  
  

\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .