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How can I make this table in Latex? The table is taken from page 26 of this article https://arxiv.org/pdf/1609.00046.pdf

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    This is not an appropriate question for this site. There are many places online to find information about making tables. (Search for "latex tables", for example.) Once you have the basics, post a question with a "Minimal Working Example" (MWE) containing as much of the table as you are able to create, along with specific places that you are stuck, e.g., "How to make double vertical lines".
    – Sandy G
    Oct 30, 2022 at 16:19
  • Make yourself more familiar with writing tables. Fro star can help introctory in en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LaTeX/Tables.
    – Zarko
    Oct 30, 2022 at 16:24
  • tablesgenerator.com
    – DG'
    Oct 30, 2022 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

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Articles on arxiv.org are often (most time?) uploaded as TeX-sources, as in this case. You can download the sources here, and you'll get a tarball you can unpack (tar -xvf 1609.00046). Inside of it you'll find a few files, one of which will be R2D2_2020Jun.tex and in that one starting on line 1082 you'll find the following table:

\begin{table} [h!]
    \spacingset{1.1}
    \renewcommand{\arraystretch}{1.5}\textbf{}
    \resizebox{\columnwidth}{!}{
        \begin{tabular}{|l|cc|cc||cc|cc|}
            \hline
            \multirow{4}{*}{} &\multicolumn{8}{c|}{Scenario 2 [non-zero coefficients from U(0,1)]} \\ \cline{2-9}
            & \multicolumn{4}{c||}{$\rho=0.5$}          
            & \multicolumn{4}{c|}{$\rho=0.9$} \\ \cline{2-9}
            & \multicolumn{2}{c|}{p=100} &
            \multicolumn{2}{c||}{p=500}  & \multicolumn{2}{c|}{p=100} &
            \multicolumn{2}{c|}{p=500} \\ \cline{2-9}
            & SSE & AUC & SSE & AUC & SSE & AUC & SSE & AUC\\
            \hline
            Horseshoe  & 44.1 (1.9) & 62 & 59.9 (4.8) & 58 & 41.7 (2.2) & 73 & 39.8 (3.2) & 58 \\
            \hline
            Horseshoe+ & 47.0 (2.2) & 62  & 79.2 (8.1) & 61 & 47.6 (4.2) & 73  & 44.9 (4.4) & 63 \\
            \hline
            Normal-BetaPrime  & 62.4 (2.4) & 62  & 437.1 (14.2) & 57 & 42.5 (1.7) & 70  & 1203 (55.1) & 59 \\
            \hline
            Dirichlet-Laplace  & \textbf{32.4 (0.7)} & 64  & 56.3 (5.7) & 51 & 27.3 (0.6) & 79 & 41.3 (1.2) & 64 \\
            \hline
            R2-D2 - Conditional & 34.5 (1.2) & \textbf{66} & 48.2 (2.9) & 59 & \textbf{26.3 (0.6)} & \textbf{82} & 38.1 (1.7) & 79 \\
            \hline  
            R2-D2 - Marginal & 33.7 (1.0) & 64 & \textbf{41.0 (1.3)} & \textbf{65} & 31.8 (1.2) & 76 & \textbf{34.5 (1.0)} & \textbf{82} \\
            \hline
    \end{tabular}}
    \caption {\small Average sum of squared error (SSE) and average  area under the  Receiver-Operating Characteristic curve (AUC), based on 200 simulated datasets. All values  multiplied by 10 for readability.  For SSE, standard errors are included in parentheses. For AUC, all standard errors are in the range of $0.5 - 0.7$, so omitted to save space. Note that {\it smaller} is better for SSE, while {\it larger} is better for AUC. Best performance in each column is highlighted in bold for reference.} 
    \label{table-sim-Uniform}
\end{table} 

Please note that from a typographical point of view there are a few issues with that table, so copying this style is not a good idea.

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