3

enter image description here

How to make that "F". I'm also using the multicol package

2

2 Answers 2

8

You can use the package lettrine to do the job.

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage{newtxtext} % you want true small caps
\usepackage{lettrine}

\begin{document}

\chapter{Beginning}

\lettrine{F}{ew would quarrel} about the correct way to break boiled
eggs, but, as you probably know, there was even a civil war caused
by this very important question in the island of Lilliput. You may
also know that computer scientists took the names \emph{big-endian}
and \emph{little-endian} from Swift's `Gulliver's travels'.

\end{document}

enter image description here

But you seem to want a slightly different output, with the lettrine (that means “drop cap” in French) sticking up. If you type

\lettrine[loversize=0.5]{F}{ew would quarrel}

then the output would be

enter image description here

But you don't need to add loversize=0.5 every time. Just add the appropriate setting in the document preamble.

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage{newtxtext} % you want true small caps
\usepackage{lettrine}

% lettrine settings
\renewcommand*{\DefaultLoversize}{0.5}
%%%

\begin{document}

\chapter{Beginning}

\lettrine{F}{ew would quarrel} about the correct way to break boiled
eggs, but, as you probably know, there was even a civil war caused
by this very important question in the island of Lilliput. You may
also know that computer scientists took the names \emph{big-endian}
and \emph{little-endian} from Swift's `Gulliver's travels'.

\end{document}

enter image description here

Personal opinion: I'd never use drop caps and Times.

2

Note: See "Typesetting dropped capitals with LaTeX" See also "How to increase the size of first character in a chapter (Drop-Caps)"

I've been using the lettrine package for some time:

\usepackage{lettrine}

I've made the lettrine package available via a simple definition:

%___________ Define \plett ____________
\makeatletter
\def\plett#1{%
\StrLeft{#1}{1}[\myfirstletter]%
\StrGobbleLeft{#1}{1}[\myrestofword]
\lettrine[lines=3]{\myfirstletter}{\trimright{\myrestofword}}
}
\makeatother

I find that [lines=3] e.g. the height of the dropped capitol in the number of lines, suits most of my needs, but can be easily adjusted.

A typical example of how to apply the \plett code would be:

\plett{Fire can exist} in many forms. Over the course of human history, we have utilized fire in it’s many likenesses to accomplish what we otherwise could not. \par

For added effect, I've adjusted the color of the initial character with the following:

\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\color{BrickRed}}  % See LaTeX/Colors

Where I've define BrickRed as:

\definecolor{BrickRed}{RGB}{144,44,30} 

Lastly, I added the \trimright function (from an SE posting) that is called in the \plett function (See 'Define \trimleft & \trimright' in the MWE.).

%_________________________________________

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lettrine}
\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage{lmodern}
\usepackage{xcolor}
\usepackage{xstring}


\definecolor{BrickRed}{RGB}{144,44,30} 

%___________ Define \plett ____________
    \makeatletter
    \def\plett#1{%
    \StrLeft{#1}{1}[\myfirstletter]%
    \StrGobbleLeft{#1}{1}[\myrestofword]
    \lettrine[lines=3]{\myfirstletter}{\trimright{\myrestofword}}
    }
    \makeatother

%________ Define \trimleft & \trimright _______
% Trimming whitespace around text (like LTRIM, RTRIM and TRIM)
\begingroup
  %
  % This plain TeX code uses the prefix "tsp", and defines
  % \trim, \trimleft, and \trimright.
  %
  \catcode`@=11
  \long\gdef\trim#1{\trimleft{\trimright{#1}}}
  %
  % Trimming spaces on the right is done by repeatedly calling \unskip
  % until \lastskip is zero.  We start with \hskip0pt\relax to stop
  % \trimright from trimming spaces _before_ #1 in case this only
  % contains spaces.
  %
  \long\gdef\trimright#1{\hskip0pt\relax #1\tsp@right}
  \gdef\tsp@right
    {\unskip\ifdim0pt=\lastskip\else\expandafter\tsp@right\fi}
  %
  % Trimming spaces on the left is done by repeatedly using \futurelet
  % to test the first token, and dispatching depending on what is found.
  % Expandable tokens are expanded; most assignments are performed;
  % spaces are ignored; groups are entered.  The loop ends when
  % encountering \tsp@left@end.
  %
  \long\gdef\trimleft#1{\tsp@left#1\tsp@left@end}
  \global\let\tsp@left@end\relax
  \gdef\tsp@left{\expandafter\tsp@left@look}
  \gdef\tsp@left@look{\futurelet\tsp@token\tsp@left@test}
  \gdef\tsp@left@test
    {%
      \typeout{\meaning\tsp@token}%
      \expandafter\ifx\noexpand\tsp@token\tsp@token
        \expandafter\@secondoftwo
      \else
        \expandafter\@firstoftwo
      \fi
      {% Expandable token => expand again.
        \let\tsp@next\tsp@left
      }%
      {%
        \ifcat\tsp@token\relax
          % Non-expandable primitive: build \tsp@<meaning>.
          % Note that primitives for which I haven't defined
          % \tsp@<meaning> just give \relax, which stops
          % trimming cleanly.
          \begingroup
            \escapechar-1%
            \global\expandafter\let\expandafter\tsp@next
              \csname tsp@\meaning\tsp@token\endcsname
          \endgroup
        \else
          % Character token.
          \ifcat\tsp@token\bgroup % Begin-group: do; continue trimming
            \bgroup\let\tsp@next\tsp@gobble@token
          \else
            \ifcat\tsp@token\egroup % End-group: do; continue trimming
              \egroup\let\tsp@next\tsp@gobble@token
            \else
              \ifcat\tsp@token\space % Space: remove; continue trimming
                \let\tsp@next\tsp@gobble@token
              \else % Anything else: stop trimming
                \let\tsp@next\relax
              \fi
            \fi
          \fi
        \fi
      }%
      \tsp@next
    }%
  \gdef\tsp@gobble@token{\afterassignment\tsp@left\let\tsp@token= }
  %
  % Helpers for defining primitives.
  %
  \long\gdef\tsp@swap#1{#1\tsp@gobble@token}
  \gdef\tsp@assignment{\afterassignment\tsp@left}
  %
  % Various primitives
  %
  \global \let \tsp@unskip     \tsp@gobble@token
  \global \expandafter \let \csname tsp@ \endcsname \tsp@gobble@token
  \global \let \tsp@begingroup \tsp@swap
  \global \let \tsp@endgroup   \tsp@swap
  \global \let \tsp@def        \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@edef       \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@gdef       \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@xdef       \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@let        \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@futurelet  \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@global     \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@long       \tsp@assignment
  \global \let \tsp@protected  \tsp@assignment
  \gdef\tsp@hskip#1{\begingroup\afterassignment\tsp@hskip@\skip0= }
  \gdef\tsp@hskip@{\endgroup\tsp@left}
  %
  % We must end when seeing \tsp@left@end (normally \relax)
  %
  \long\gdef\tsp@relax#1%
    {%
      \begingroup
        \def\tsp@left@end{\tsp@left@end}%
        \expandafter
      \endgroup
      \ifx#1\tsp@left@end
      \else
        \expandafter\tsp@left
      \fi
    }
\endgroup

\begin{document}

\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\color{BrickRed}}  % See LaTeX/Colors
\renewcommand{\LettrineTextFont}{\rmfamily}
% \renewcommand*{\LettrineTextFont}{\scshape}   % for French

 \plett{Fire can exist} in many forms. Over the course of human history, we have utilized fire in it’s many likenesses to accomplish what we otherwise could not. \par

\end{document}
%_________________________________________

Works nicely!

The lettrine package has several options for dropped capitols.

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