2

Minimal example:

\documentclass{report}

\begin{document}
\begin{center}

\huge LARGE TEXT \\[0.25cm]

\large SMALL TEXT \\[0.25cm]

\huge LARGE TEXT

\end{center}
\end{document}

How do I get both spaces to be 0.25cm?

2
  • what space? normally TeX works with baseline-to-baseline space but are you asking about basline-to-top-of-letter-on-next row? Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 21:08
  • @DavidCarlisle From the bottom of one row to the top of the next. Commented Nov 15, 2022 at 5:26

2 Answers 2

2

TikZ might be overkill, but it does make it easy. Otherwise you have to measure the height of your text and adjust baseline-to-baseline spacing.

enter image description here

With chains:

\documentclass{report}

\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{chains}

\begin{document} 

\begin{center}
\begin{tikzpicture}[start chain=going below, node distance=.25cm, inner sep=0, outer sep=0]
  \node[on chain]{\huge LARGE TEXT};
  \node[on chain]{\large SMALL TEXT};
  \node[on chain]{\huge LARGE TEXT};
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{center}

\end{document}

With positioning:

\documentclass{report}

\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{positioning}

\begin{document}

\begin{center}
\begin{tikzpicture}[node distance=.25cm, inner sep=0, outer sep=0]
  \node(A){\huge LARGE TEXT};
  \node[below=of A](B){\large SMALL TEXT};
  \node[below=of B]{\huge LARGE TEXT};
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{center}

\end{document}
1

The following works only with capital letters, as they have equal height and no descender.

\documentclass{report}

\begin{document}

\begin{center}
\linespread{0}\setlength{\lineskip}{3ex}% or whatever you want

\huge LARGE TEXT \\
\large SMALL TEXT \\
\huge LARGE TEXT

\end{center}

\end{document}

enter image description here

No measuring is necessary, because the normal distance between baselines is set to zero with \linespread{0}. But when TeX typesets the thing, \lineskip kicks in because any two lines are obviously too near to each other, so the same vertical spacing is inserted between lines.

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