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For my bachelor thesis, I want to show these reactions but I have no clue how I can put them nicely in LaTex.Reactions in my Thesis

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  • the overleaf tag isn't necessary because this has nothing to do with overleaf per se.
    – anis
    Dec 20, 2022 at 12:36

2 Answers 2

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\documentclass[border=5mm]{standalone}
\usepackage{chemfig}
\definesubmol{ro}{\textcolor{red}{O}}
\definesubmol{gme}{
    \textcolor{gray}{C}|\textcolor{gray}{H}_{\textcolor{gray}{3}}
}
\definesubmol{gmer}{
    \textcolor{gray}{H}_{\textcolor{gray}{3}}|{\textcolor{gray}{C}}
}
\begin{document}
    \schemestart
    \chemfig{(-[:-42]*5(=-=(-!{gme})-!{ro}-))(-[:78]*5(=-=-!{ro}-))(-[:198]*5(-!{ro}-(-!{gmer})=-=))}
    \arrow[,,,,red]
    \chemfig[angle increment=30]{(-[1]-[3]-[1]!{gme})-[9](-[7]-[5]-[7]-[5]-[7]!{gmer})-[-1]-[1]-[-1]-[1]-[-1]-[1]!{gme}}
    \schemestop
\end{document}

enter image description here

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Hi and welcome among us.

You are asking if you can draw anything with LaTeX. Yes, you can with the tikz package.

There are also chemfig and chemmacros packages. Here are some examples of chemistry.

I have to warn you that Tikz's learning curve is steep as hell. It also makes nearly anything possible to plot.

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