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I'm aware that this might not be a very transcendental question, but I've noticed something very particular with the math fonts in mtpro2. It turns out that the letter "f" is slightly different displayed when using math mode in comparison with the emphasis or italic modes. In the first one, the "f" is larger and wider. Of course, the difference is very subtle, but honestly I prefer the italic version. Is there a way to set the math letters to have the italic shape? Thanks in advance. enter image description here

Pd: The same occurs with "u" and "v". This case is more clear.

enter image description here

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    Welcome to tex.sx. I won't comment on the f, but there's a good reason that the math v has a different shape: consider the shape of \nu. Times italic v and \nu are too easily confused; Knuth addressed this problem in Computer Modern by just making all italic vs rounded at the bottom. Feb 26, 2023 at 19:48
  • you see the same with almost all math fonts. Feb 26, 2023 at 20:06
  • @DavidCarlisle but in Computer Modern, the math font is the same as the italic font. What I see is that in mtpro2 the math and italic fonts are not quite the same Feb 26, 2023 at 20:10
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    no! cm math italic is not the same as the text italic, it has a wider f and modified v and wider sidebearings generally. Feb 26, 2023 at 20:21
  • @EstebanSaldarriaga \it and \teni ie cmit and cmmit fonts in plain tex look at the f Feb 26, 2023 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

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The MTPro2 fonts don't provide a text font and you have to supply a clone of Times yourself.

With newtxtext we can compare the height of a math and a text italic x to get

enter image description here

respectively. OK, let's apply a magnification by a factor 1.0316

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[scale=1.0316]{newtxtext}
\usepackage[lite]{mtpro2}

\begin{document}

$f$\textit{f}

\sbox0{$x$}\the\ht0

\sbox0{\itshape x}\the\ht0

\end{document}

enter image description here

Now text italic and math italic have the same height and, indeed, the two f letters are comparable in vertical size. Not in precise shape, but that's common for math fonts, as barbara beeton remarks.

It's not so difficult to change the round math italic v into the text italic v or to borrow it from newtxmath. I wouldn't recommend it.

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    +1 for the scale=1.0316 option. It's worth noting that this works not only for the f glyph, but for virtually all other Latin-alphabet glyphs as well.
    – Mico
    Feb 27, 2023 at 1:47
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Just to show the difference between text italic and math in Computer Modern. Most (all?) letters have slightly different shape.

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{xcolor}

\begin{document}

\ooalign{\hfil$b$\hfil\cr\hfil\textcolor{red}{\textit{b}}\hfil\cr}%
\ooalign{\hfil$c$\hfil\cr\hfil\textcolor{red}{\textit{c}}\hfil\cr}%
\ooalign{\hfil$g$\hfil\cr\hfil\textcolor{red}{\textit{g}}\hfil\cr}%
\ooalign{\hfil$m$\hfil\cr\hfil\textcolor{red}{\textit{m}}\hfil\cr}

\end{document}

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