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This is from texdoc circuitikz:

If you want different symbols for input and output you can use a null symbol and put them manually using the border anchors.

\begin{circuitikz}[]
\ctikzset{amplifiers/plus={}}
\ctikzset{amplifiers/minus={}}
\draw (0,0) node[fd op amp](A){};
\node [font=\small\bfseries, right] at(A.bin up) {1};
\node [font=\small\bfseries, right] at(A.bin down) {2};
\node [font=\small\bfseries, below] at(A.bout up) {3};
\node [font=\small\bfseries, above] at(A.bout down) {4};
\end{circuitikz}

enter image description here

I want to use this feature in op amp, so I changed fd op amp to op amp

But this gives an error:

Package PGF Math: Unknown function `out' (in 'bout up').

How can I use different symbols for input and output in op amp

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2 Answers 2

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Normal op amps have just one output, so it breaks when you ask for a non-existing anchor. So you can use the same trick but the anchor for the output is a plain bout:

\documentclass[border=2.72mm,preview]{standalone}
\usepackage{circuitikz}
\begin{document}
\begin{circuitikz}[]
    \ctikzset{amplifiers/plus={}}
    \ctikzset{amplifiers/minus={}}
    \draw (0,0) node[op amp](A){};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, right] at(A.bin up) {1};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, right] at(A.bin down) {2};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, left=6pt] at(A.bout) {3};
    \end{circuitikz}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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Edited from @Rmano

\documentclass[border=2.72mm,preview]{standalone}
\usepackage{circuitikz}
\begin{document}
\begin{circuitikz}[]
    \ctikzset{amplifiers/plus={}}
    \ctikzset{amplifiers/minus={}}
    \draw (0,0) node[op amp](A){};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, right=10pt] at(A.-) {1};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, right=10pt] at(A.+) {2};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, left=15pt] at(A.out) {3};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, below] at(A.up) {4};
    \node [font=\small\bfseries, above] at(A.down) {5};
    \end{circuitikz}
\end{document}

enter image description here

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