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XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX support Unicode, and are perhaps also in some other ways better than pdfLaTeX.

However, are mathematical and logical journals prepared for submissions prepared with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX? Perhaps it is more prudent to prepare one's work with standard pdfLaTeX?

I am a bit wary about these things, as I one time when finishing an essay for a book was suddenly told that they just accepted word-submissions.

What is a prudent strategy if one wants to have an essay published in a good logic journal?

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    I can't speak for other publishers, but the AMS has been using XeLaTeX for several years. I don't know the status of LuaLaTeX there, but I'm skeptical. May 13, 2023 at 0:13
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    You presumably know much better than most users of this site which the "good logic journals" are. Why don't you contact the editorial offices of these journals directly and ask them if they accept manuscripts that require either XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX to compile them?
    – Mico
    May 13, 2023 at 7:07
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    your question can't really be answered the typesetting system used by a journal is not always public it is commercial information. even if they accept latex source from authors as a convenience they may not use tex in production, so luatex or pdftex makes little difference compared to not using complicated local macros that break the conversion May 13, 2023 at 7:35
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    I am not sure how to understand your question. If I only take "are XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX acceptable when submitting an article", this of course can only be answered by the publishers of the relevant journal. They may accept it or not and different journals will handle things differently. If you want to hand in a paper to different journals, it is probably a good idea to stick with PDFLaTeX to be as compatible as possible. But maybe even this is not the optimal way, since some journals might not accept TeX at all ... Be it as it may, your question can't really be answered on this site, I fear. May 14, 2023 at 0:17
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    @JasperHabicht -- I agree that this question is probably answerable only by the editors of the journals involved, and not here. But it's certainly not "opinion-based"; "not suitable for this site" would be justifiable. May 14, 2023 at 2:27

1 Answer 1

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As I said in the comments, this is an answer I prepared to the original question. Maybe you could consider having two separate main files, to be used with XeLaTeX or LuaLaTeX (e.g. your own copy that you could host and distribute), and pdflatex respectively:

xelatex main_xelatex.tex
pdflatex main_pdflatex.tex

The changes required to switch from one to the other are certainly not comparable to the hassle of having to switch between LaTeX and Word; it is rather quite small all in all. I have been doing that, personally.

You can then e.g. write your document's contents in a manuscript.tex file and use \input manuscript.tex in between begin{document} and end{document} to include the actual contents in both your setups.

You can moreover easily reuse this setup for your later publications.

I have just written a MWE demo for you. There are more elaborate ways to do it, but this is simple and works.

main_xelatex.tex
\documentclass[11pt, a4paper]{article}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\usepackage{microtype}
\usepackage{xltxtra}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{mathrsfs}
\usepackage{latexsym}
\usepackage{euscript}

\usepackage{lipsum}

\title{Lorem Ipsum}
\author{René Descartes}

\begin{document}
    \setmainfont{TheSansOsF} % or any other font you want XeLaTeX to use.
    \input manuscript.tex
\end{document}

Note that in this example main_xelatex.tex is compatible with both XeLaTeX and LuaLaTeX.

main_pdflatex.tex
\documentclass[11pt, a4paper]{article}

\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{mathrsfs}
\usepackage{latexsym}
\usepackage{euscript}

\usepackage{lipsum}

\title{Lorem Ipsum}
\author{René Descartes}

\begin{document}
    \input manuscript.tex
\end{document}
manuscript.tex
\maketitle

\begin{abstract}
\lipsum[1]
\end{abstract}

\section{Introduction}
    \lipsum[2-4]

% ETC ...
XeLaTeX output

xelatex_result

pdflatex output

pdflatex_result

I am essentially always using XeLaTeX nowadays when writing documents, knowing it's easy to switch if needed (since I only input text, pictures, and maths). Of course, if you know for sure that what you are currently writing is for a paper in a specific journal, then contacting them beforehand is the safest approach I would say.

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