7

Consider the reference mark symbol, ※, also pictured below:

Reference mark

How can I write this symbol in TeX?

4
  • 5
    This is available in The Comprehensive LaTeX Symbol List (Table 46: Miscellaneous textcomp Symbols).
    – Werner
    Commented Jul 14, 2023 at 16:47
  • 2
    What's the usage of this symbol?
    – user78499
    Commented Jul 14, 2023 at 22:13
  • 1
    @User It is one of the symbols used to show contradiction.
    – user300696
    Commented Jul 15, 2023 at 3:30
  • 1
    I use it in the margin of my papers instead of "TODO" or "FIXME". But that's really up to you :-) That said, I simply use the Unicode character U+203B REFERENCE MARK directly.
    – Ingmar
    Commented Jul 17, 2023 at 5:36

4 Answers 4

13

Use \textreferencemark:

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}

\textreferencemark

\end{document}

The results with xelatex and pdflatex are a little different, see the following screenshots:

xelatex pdflatex
6

I used \bigtimes from Unicode math. Define \timesdots like this:

\def\timesdots{\vbox{\baselineskip=0pt \lineskiplimit=-\maxdimen 
   \halign{\hfil##\hfil\cr
      $\cdot\kern-.44em\bigtimes\kern-.44em\cdot$\cr\noalign{\kern.2em}
      .\cr\noalign{\kern-.8em}.\cr\noalign{\kern.6em}}}%
}

If you want to use Unicode character U+203B (Reference Mark), then you can use \char"203B in Unicode TeX engine or directly use it ※ in your TeX source file.

6

Picture mode!

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{pict2e}

\newcommand{\blob}{%
  \raisebox{0.02em}{%
    \setlength{\unitlength}{0.107em}%
    \linethickness{0.4\unitlength}%
    \begin{picture}(8,6)
    \roundcap
    \Line(1,0)(7,6)
    \Line(1,6)(7,0)
    \put(4,0.5){\makebox(0,0){.}}
    \put(6.5,3){\makebox(0,0){.}}
    \put(4,5.5){\makebox(0,0){.}}
    \put(1.5,3){\makebox(0,0){.}}%
    \end{picture}%
  }%
}

\begin{document}

A\blob B

\end{document}

enter image description here

3
\usepackage{mathabx}

\begin{document}
$ \divideontimes$

enter image description here

Not exactly, but similar :-))

1
  • Almost – but not entirely – quite unlike it ;-)
    – Ingmar
    Commented Jul 17, 2023 at 5:37

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