1

I have the exponential function that I wrote as:

\begin{equation}
    e^{\left(\frac{R_G^2\cdot q^2}{3}\right)}
\end{equation}

which appears as:

1

and I don't like the spacing in particular the denominator space at the bottom looks weird in combination with the brackets. I tried other brackets, e.g., the "big" ones look a bit better, I guess, but too small...

\begin{equation}
    e^{\bigl(\frac{R_G^2\cdot q^2}{3}\bigr)}
\end{equation}

Here is the result:

1

Any suggestions?

3
  • It's actually e^{-(---)}, but I guess that doesn't matter much for the question.
    – HyperQ
    Aug 31, 2023 at 5:12
  • 1
    Take a look at \big and its friends from the amsmath package.
    – projetmbc
    Aug 31, 2023 at 5:31
  • Avoid fractions and other large expressions in super- and subscripts as much as possible. There is always some more elegant way to rewrite it, e.g. as \exp(...), or, if you are taking powers of something other than e, as something like $a^{w}$, where $w=R_G^2 q^2/3$.
    – Gaussler
    Aug 31, 2023 at 12:23

1 Answer 1

2

Parenthesis are always symmetric around fraction. You may simple omit them or even write your equation on one of the following ways:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
\begin{equation}
    e^{(R_G^2 q^2/3)}
\end{equation}
or
\begin{equation}
    e^{R_G^2 q^2/3}
\end{equation}
or 
\begin{equation}
    \exp(R_G^2 q^2/3)
\end{equation}
\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • Especially the last option cannot be recommended enough.
    – Gaussler
    Aug 31, 2023 at 12:20

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