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Given that “C. A. R. Hoare” is a very standard way of formally citing the researcher, how would we do this in a German text? My current choice is to handle “C. A. R.” similar to acronyms (cf. Inside German abbreviations, how to set the penalty and the width of the internal space including the stretch and shrink attributes? ) and say

\documentclass[ngerman]{article}
\pagestyle{empty}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\newcommand{\GermanAcronymSpace}{\hskip.5\fontdimen2\font plus.5\fontdimen3\font minus.5\fontdimen4\font}%%% breakable and stretchable thin space to be used in acronyms such as “d. h.”, “z. B.”, “i. d. R.”, and “u. a.”; cf. http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/708661 .
\begin{document}
C.\penalty1\GermanAcronymSpace A.\penalty1\GermanAcronymSpace R.\@\penalty1\ Hoare%%% alternatively, … R.\penalty1\ Hoare
\end{document}

output

Of course, you might opt for spaces of standard width and no penalty at all (i.e., simply say C. A. R. Hoare in LaTeX), but then you might get (in my view) excessive spacing without need and potential hazards in the output:

      […] Geleistet wurde die Pionierarbeit von C. A.
[LaTeX decided to introduce a page break here]
R. Hoare: „Computer programming is an exact science“.

Above, the reader could think of the pioneer work of “C. A.”, whoever it might be, and a separate heading quoting a sentence by “R. Hoare”. At the same time, completely prohibiting the line breaks inside “C. A. R.” is not good if you typeset lots of text and can run into worse typographical problems in the same paragraph if “C. A. R.” is kept together (e.g., overfull boxes or bad hyphenations of other words).

Any better ideas (if so, please with rationale) on how to properly typeset “C. A. R. Hoare” in German typography in the middle of a sentence in general? Or is the above suggestion good enough in general? You might consider changing the penalties (if so, why) or 50 % of the various \fontdimensions to something else (if so, why).

2 Answers 2

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I don't think you ever want to break after an initial in a name so I'd use ~ or \,.

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\usepackage{xspace}
\newcommand\CARHoare{C.\,A.\,R.~Hoare\xspace}

Should never be hyphenated and maybe that you need sloppypar in some (rare) cases:

\begin{sloppypar}
...  a paragraph with \CARHoare with problems in justifying the text
\end{sloppypar}
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  • Or just put the whole thing in a \mbox or \hbox. Commented Feb 4 at 14:36
  • That does'n solve the justifying problem inside a paragraph.
    – user187802
    Commented Feb 4 at 19:58

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