1

Runnin pdflatex and biber in a loop on

\documentclass{article}
\pagestyle{empty}
\usepackage[backend=biber]{biblatex}
\begin{filecontents}[overwrite]{mwe.bib}
@article{Test,
  author       = {{The spacefactor of the period in author is \the\sfcode`\..}},
  title        = {The spacefactor of the period in title is \the\sfcode`\..},
  journal      = {The spacefactor of the period in journal is \the\sfcode`\..}
}
\end{filecontents}
\addbibresource{mwe.bib}
\begin{document}
The spacefactor of the period is \the\sfcode`\..
\cite{Test}
\printbibliography
\end{document}

yields

The spacefactor of the period is 3000. [1]

**References **

[1] The spacefactor of the period in author is 1006. “The spacefactor of the period in title is 1006.” In: The spacefactor of the period in journal is 1006. ().

Any rationale on why the space factor changes to 1006?

1 Answer 1

4

Quoting egreg in another question related to csquotes:

...different space factors can be used to know what punctuation sign is the last character. The same strategy is used in amsthm.sty, which modifies \frenchspacing to be

\def\nopunct{\spacefactor 1007 }
\def\frenchspacing{\sfcode`\.1006\sfcode`\?1005\sfcode`\!1004%
  \sfcode`\:1003\sfcode`\;1002\sfcode`\,1001 }

for the \@addpunct macro. The changes in the stretch and shrink components are negligible.

See the complete answer here

Further reading on how this is implemented in this related question.

3
  • How is biblatex related to amsthm or csquotes?
    – AlMa1r
    Feb 25 at 12:10
  • Further, note that in bibliographies you often have unbreakable items, such as URLs or proper names. Moreover, a part of the line width is eaten by the textual label of a bibliographic entry and the gap after it. Therefore, more stretching and shrinking happens in the bibliography than in the usual natural-language text in the main part of your document.
    – AlMa1r
    Feb 25 at 12:15
  • The bibliography style may require adding punctuation and you need to avoid adding double punctuation
    – Mane32
    Feb 25 at 16:05

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