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Is there by chance a math font resembling the sample equations in these trimmed images? enter image description here

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

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This seems to provide a decent emulation. You can possibly do better for the integral symbol.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{mlmodern}
\usepackage[nolimits]{cmupint}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{microtype}

\DisableLigatures[f]{encoding=\encodingdefault,family=\familydefault}

\DeclareSymbolFont{slanted}{\encodingdefault}{\familydefault}{m}{sl}
\DeclareMathSymbol{g}{\mathalpha}{slanted}{`g}

\DeclareFontFamily{U}{cmupint}{}
\DeclareFontShape{U}{cmupint}{m}{n}{ <-> s*[0.8] cmupint}{}


\begin{document}

$g_n$ is the coefficient of $x^n$ in the expansion of
\[
\frac{x^{n+1}}{\{y_1(x+a)\}^2}\exp\Bigl[-\int_0^x up(u)\,du\Bigr].
\]
It may happen that $g_n=0$ in which case $y_2(x)$ denotes
a logarithmic term.

\textbf{The Point at Infinity.}\quad In many problems

\end{document}

enter image description here

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  • Thank you very much, I'll look into it. Me and my partner are trying to restore an old book by Ian Sneddon in LaTeX.
    – Conreu
    Mar 20 at 12:07
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My Old version

enter image description here

\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{mathspec}
\defaultfontfeatures{Mapping=tex-text}
\setallmainfonts{Old Standard}
\DeclareSymbolFont{mathptmxlargesymbols}{OMX}{ztmcm}{m}{n}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\upsumop}{\mathop}{mathptmxlargesymbols}{"50}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\upprodop}{\mathop}{mathptmxlargesymbols}{"51}
\begin{document}
, for there coordinates, Laplace's equation in the form
\[\frac{\partial^2\psi}{\partial \rho^2} +\frac{1}{\varrho}\frac{\partial\psi}{\partial\varrho}+\frac{1}{\varrho^2}\frac{\partial^2\psi}{\partial\phi^2}+\frac{\partial^2\psi }{\partial z^2}=0.\]

\end{document}

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