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I want to add alternative text (Alt-text) to have a dialogue box appear when hovering over the figures. Additionally, I need to ensure PDF accessibility tagging is implemented in this PDF. My MWE is below

\DocumentMetadata{}

\documentclass{book}

\twocolumn


\usepackage{amssymb,amsfonts}%
\usepackage{graphicx}%
\usepackage{tagpdf}
\usepackage{hyperxmp}
\usepackage{hyperref}%
\usepackage{booktabs}

\begin{document}

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.\begin{figure*}[!t]
\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure}\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure,alttext={Alt text content figure one}}\includegraphics[scale=0.5]{example-image}\tagmcend\tagstructend
\caption{Figure one with caption.}
\end{figure*}

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.


The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

\begin{figure*}[!t]
\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure}\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure,alttext={Alt text content figure two}}\includegraphics[scale=0.5]{example-image}\tagmcend\tagstructend
\caption{Figure with caption two.}
\end{figure*}

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.
\begin{figure*}[!t]
\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure}\tagstructbegin{tag=Figure,alttext={Alt text content figure three}}\includegraphics[scale=0.5]{example-image}\tagmcend\tagstructend
\caption{Figure with caption three.}
\end{figure*}
\begin{table*}[!t]
\begin{tabular*}{\linewidth}{@{}lll@{}}
First10 & First20 & First30\\
First11 & First21 & First31\\
First12 & First22 & First32\\
First13 & First23 & First33\\
First14 & First24 & First34\\
First15 & First25 & First35\\
\end{tabular*}
\end{table*}

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy policies.


\end{document}

Expected output like below:

enter image description here

1 Answer 1

1

Tagging can not be done by adding a few structure commands only in a few places. You must tag the whole document. The needed modules should be loaded in \DocumentMetadata.

Something like this will work (at best compile with lualatex). Please note that the pop-up of the alt text only appears if you embed a png or a jpg file, if you include a pdf it is not seen (at least on my pdf viewer):

\DocumentMetadata{testphase={phase-III,table}} %add more modules as needed

\documentclass{book}

\twocolumn

\usepackage{amssymb,amsfonts}%
\usepackage{graphicx}%
\usepackage{hyperref}%
\usepackage{booktabs}

\begin{document}

The presence of non-Arctic and non-European countries in the Arctic has been 
growing over the past two decades. Given the geographic distance of these 
countries from the polar region, their presence in the High North may seem 
surprising. In this article, we study the presence in Svalbard of scientists 
from different origins and how they interact through an analysis of the field 
missions in which they are involved. Combining network analysis and 
interviews, we highlight the role of the stations located in the archipelago 
for access to the field and the cooperation strategies of scientists, 
including those from countries that do not have stations above the Arctic 
Circle. We tackle issues of integration in this area by empirically 
discussing three logics: (1) scientific autonomy, (2) core-periphery 
structure, and (3) regional patterns of cooperation, thus going beyond an 
approach strictly limited to the analysis of science diplomacy 
policies.

\begin{figure*}
\includegraphics[scale=0.5,alt=Alt text content figure one]{example-image.png}
\caption{Figure one with caption.}
\end{figure*}

\begin{table*}[!t]
\begin{tabular*}{\linewidth}{@{}lll@{}}
First10 & First20 & First30\\
First11 & First21 & First31\\
First12 & First22 & First32\\
First13 & First23 & First33\\
First14 & First24 & First34\\
First15 & First25 & First35\\
\end{tabular*}
\end{table*}

\end{document}

enter image description here

1
  • I have raised this issue in the GitHub Commented May 3 at 12:33

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